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Masters of Engineering managemnt. Is it a good Idea

billytoall289billytoall289 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
edited November 2012 in Graduate School
ello guys, I wanted some help reading weather to go for a graduate degree in Engineering management. I have not yet to read anything positive about this major. I am almost finished with my bachelors in Engineering Sciences From Stony Brook University, and I have applied and been excepted in the engineering management program at Syracuse University. I wanted to know if it is worth it. It would be great to hear from someone who is actually familiar with the degree or someone who has done something like it. I wanted to know if it give me a better chance of getting a job. So far I haven't had much luck finding anything because my major is not specific enough. I have not been told that in any interviews, but the more job add I read the more I realize that I lack real engineering knowledge. I have also read any a few forums that MBA is a better route, but due to my GPA and lack of skills in taking the GMAT I would not have had any luck in getting in a good school. I just want some help and guidance. Can anyone please help?

Regards Bill
Post edited by billytoall289 on

Replies to: Masters of Engineering managemnt. Is it a good Idea

  • cosmicfishcosmicfish Posts: 3,427Registered User Senior Member
    Bill,

    I would NOT recommend this degree at this time. Engineering Management programs are really (even more than the MBA) meant for experienced professionals. I have seen people without experience get this type of degree, and it does not end well - not only are they unable to get management jobs, but the technical positions disappear because of their "management focus".

    This type of degree is for people who want to be "interior" management - managing groups that do not really deal with the world outside the company. You manage groups of engineers, take care of hiring and firing, etc. No customer contact, and no hard-core business issues (like accounting or business planning). All of the successful ones I know spent 5+ years working as a technical professional and THEN got the degree. In my company, these kinds of positions REQUIRE 6+ years to even be considered, and the degree will not help before then.

    If you need to burnish your credentials, then get a technical masters. You are starting from a bad position, and it is going to take years to get the grades and skills you should have gotten as an undergrad.
  • billytoall289billytoall289 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    I am sorry about the spelling and the grammatical mistakes. I was in a hurry and never got a chance to read it. So what advice if any would you give me? I have had a few internships and a part time job as an assistant engineer, so I have some experience but nothing concrete. In this economy I am running out of options, and this was a backup plan.

    Regards Bill
  • MomwaitingfornewMomwaitingfornew Posts: 5,821Registered User Senior Member
    What kind of engineering are you interested in? Is it too late to apply to master's programs in that branch? When cosmicfish said that you might want to pursue a technical degree, I think (and he can correct me) that he meant one that helps you specialize. Also, some universities offer a fifth year for students to get a master's degree. Does Stony Brook?
  • MomwaitingfornewMomwaitingfornew Posts: 5,821Registered User Senior Member
    One more thing: I believe at least two more CC members have applied to engineering management programs. You might want to do a forum search, and then PM them to get their thoughts.
  • billytoall289billytoall289 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    Hello,
    First of all thanks a lot for the replies
    Well honestly I am not that Enthusiastic about engineering. The only reason why I went for this major to begin with was, because everyone told me that I would easily find a job. I have always been more interested in business than engineering. I don’t know if I mentioned this but Syracuse University is also offering a very generous grant, so basically I am between a rock and a hard place.
  • cosmicfishcosmicfish Posts: 3,427Registered User Senior Member
    Billy, apparently you got some bad advice - engineering is a terrible field to go into if you do not enjoy it. It DOES position you well for certain other fields, but in most cases there are easier routes to take that are just as effective.

    If you want to go into the business side, an MBA would be the best way to go, but if that is not an option for you, talk to the people at Cuse and see what their graduates do in industry. If they are doing things you like, go for it - you are in a bad place right now and maybe you can use this to work your way to something good. I think your best likely result is that you get this masters and then find your way to an entry-level business position.
  • billytoall289billytoall289 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    Thanks for the advice.
  • billytoall289billytoall289 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    I honestly am just worried that I would finish the program, and would still be unable to find a job. I heard the alumni contact and career center in Syracuse University is very good at finding jobs for it's students. I like the degree, but not sure about the job prospects. can any one help me in that regards.
  • varunfernandovarunfernando Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    Dear,
    Please guide me, I have completed by BE in instrumentation engineering in 2010 and i am working for the past 2 years in a petrochemical industries in India as well in saudi. I wish to take a master degree, is my decision a correct or should i continue with my job. I have no job satisfaction. I wish u may help me in taking carrier guidance. If so what course should i take, how about engineering management or with the course related with by BE .....
  • aerokid1491aerokid1491 Posts: 379Registered User Member
    Hey varunfernando, getting a masters degree is always a step in the right direction if you can afford it and are passionate about a particular subject. Given that, do you have anything you are particularly passionate about that you would enjoy doing as a career?

    I personally haven't gone out and gotten any engineering management degree or anything but I have been told by engineers who got MBAs, which I assume is fairly similar, that it wasn't the best choice for them because they still wanted to be involved with the technology. So, from what I have found out, if you want to go for management, don't expect tons of opportunities to help engineer many new products.

    Now, surely there are more individuals that have better knowledge with this aspect so I would hope someone will say where I am wrong in what I said above.
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