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Asian American Admission Rate ?

toughyeartoughyear Posts: 331Registered User Member
edited June 2011 in Harvard University
Does anyone know the Asian American Admission Rate ? Is this data available to the public ?

For 35,000 applicants, and 2,000 class size

If Asian Americans are 25% of the Applicant pool and 14% of the Incoming Class, then the admission rate will be near 3.2%, while the overall rate is 5.7%.

In other words, the Asian American admission rate will be just over HALF the overall admission rate.

Note: the figure 14% of incoming class is for the incoming Fall 2009 class of Yale from this post
http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/multiple-degree-programs/692871-usc-bacc-md-program-vs-yale-vs-northwestern-hpme-premed.html#post7989726
Post edited by toughyear on
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Replies to: Asian American Admission Rate ?

  • Jimmy797Jimmy797 Posts: 868Registered User Member
    Overall rate is 6.2%.
    Racial admission rate is usually almost the same as the division in the applicant pool/public, not sure which. Anyway if 14% of the applicant pool was Asian American then they'd also have a 6.2% admissions rate. It's not significantly higher or lower for any race if I'm not mistaken.
  • FatumFatum Posts: 870Registered User Member
    A more interesting question (to me..)...how many Asians turn down their harvard acceptances? my guess..1%. :)
  • toughyeartoughyear Posts: 331Registered User Member
    Racial admission rate is usually almost the same as the division in the applicant pool/public, not sure which.
    I think it is 'public'. Isn't this also the basis of 'affirmative action? Nobody seems to know the racial data of applicant pool. my experience has been, it is as difficult for a white to gain admission to harvard (or HYPe) as an asian american to gain admission into a top school that does not exercise the affirmative action. For an asian american to be admitted to HYPe it is doubly difficult. Unless the racial data is made known, it is not possible to know exactly how much more competition the asian applicants face. The affirmative action suppresses asian american admissions. Just look at the Yale number (Fall 2009) ... 69% white, 14% asian american, 9% african american, 8% Hispanic ... I wouldn't be surprised if the proportion of applicants is more than double the proportion of this incoming class for asian americans. for the highschool where my children attended (a very competitive public school), i sort of know when the next harvard admission will happen -- it will be when the valedictorian is a non-asian american. Wish the data on the number of applicants according to race is available. Then it will be easier to assess the competition.
  • wisdom908wisdom908 Posts: 136Registered User Junior Member
    Are Indian subcontinents considered in the same pool as Asian Americans? is it easier or harder for an Indian subcontinent to get into HYPD & such schools than it is a "true" Asian ?
    What about just not listing ethnicity? Would that possibly affect the admission for an Asian americna.
  • BillyMcBillyMc Posts: 7,753. Senior Member
    If Asian Americans are 25% of the Applicant pool and 14% of the Incoming Class, then the admission rate will be near 3.2%, while the overall rate is 5.7%.
    You aren't factoring yield. Harvard's is like 75% or so. Don't know what racial variations would be, if there were any.
    Are Indian subcontinents considered in the same pool as Asian Americans? is it easier or harder for an Indian subcontinent to get into HYPD & such schools than it is a "true" Asian ?
    I would imagine that it is extraordinarily difficult for a subcontinent to gain admission to a university. Bright side is, I bet they're underrepresented.
  • toughyeartoughyear Posts: 331Registered User Member
    You aren't factoring yield. Harvard's is like 75% or so. Don't know what racial variations would be, if there were any.
    Well, lets first get the zeroth order number. Then we can fine tune for more accuracy. So, forget those 1st or 2nd order factors like yield variations or even applicant's average stat.

    What would be the closest Asian American's Admission Rate: 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, or 5% ?
    I say 3%.
    I would imagine that it is extraordinarily difficult for a subcontinent to gain admission to a university. Bright side is, I bet they're underrepresented.
    :D
  • HannaHanna Posts: 11,330Registered User Senior Member
    It is a big mistake to focus on this to try to calculate your personal odds. No matter who you are, your odds of getting in are low. People try to quantify it in order to feel some sense of control over the process. You can't control it. It will just torture you if you try. Do your best in high school, hope for admission, expect a denial, and leave it at that.
  • T26E4T26E4 Posts: 16,582Registered User Senior Member
    ^ Agreed. My test scores landed me below the 50th percentile and I was probably ranked 10th or so in my graduating class -- eventually matriculating at a H peer college. Imagine that. Me, a Chinese American kid -- and NOT with blistering SATs and getting into several Ivies and top engineering programs applied -- no rejections.

    I believe I got into all the schools because I had a unique story -- was a top student leader in an predom African American HS. I'm sure there were tons of Asians w/better scores than mine. But I guess my story mattered more than my SATs to the Ivies to which I applied.

    Being on this other side of the table now, I see many high performing Asian kids applying (along with many non-Asians of course). Some appear to be interesting, others don't. The question is whether there's something interesting, along with having top notch academics, that will grab the admissions readers. That's the real key to it all.
  • toughyeartoughyear Posts: 331Registered User Member
    without this affirmative action and screening by race, asian americans could be 25-30%, not 14%, a tremendous difference which makes so many asian american applicants cry year after year on the decision day. the asian american applicants take the brunt of the share of this admission AA, an unfair bs if you ask me.
  • T26E4T26E4 Posts: 16,582Registered User Senior Member
    toughyear: No need to rehash the oft- discussed "poor me, AA hurts me".

    You can think it's BS or whatever. The fact is the top colleges are the so-called "top colleges" because they carefully craft their incoming classes to be a good mixture to the benefit of the entire student body. Want to see a completely meritocratic admissions system? Well guess what. About 80% of American colleges admit students solely by merit.

    But what rubs us wrong is that very few of those 80% are in the top 10%. Kinda ironic, no?

    Should HYPSM to admit solely by merit? Then why shouldn't their reputations plummet? Do we think that their formulae to date has failed them?

    Sorry. I don't see it like that.

    Is it screening by race? I say it's a multitude of non-unique applicants. How many Chinese or Indian, violin and/or piano and tennis playing math/sci whizzes with SATs north of 2100 does my local school district puts out? Tons.

    But even as you read my stereotype, I know that you can probably think of a half dozen kids who fit that description in your kid's own school. Do you see why that's not appealing to schools like HYP? It's not that they're Asian per se -- it's that they are so uniform. Sure they are high achieving. And they'll be rewarded for that with solid collegiate educations and good careers afterward. But that doesn't automatically qualify them for the most difficult admissions in the country.

    My half-Chinese, half-Italian straight A daughter will have a legacy at one of the HYPs. If she makes it, great. If not, still great. I've been recruiting for over 20 years and I witness to legions of great kids turned down. If my alma mater turns her down, we'll be disappointed. But I'll turn around the next year and be recruiting just as hard and donating just as much.
  • JHSJHS Posts: 14,055Registered User Senior Member
    Um, no you won't. Probably. I don't know anyone whose relationship with a college as continued unchanged after rejection of a qualified child. Too tough. You can understand why it happens, not feel anything was unfair, and it still turns everything to dust. An unqualified child who doesn't apply is a different thing.

    Nice sentiment, though. I wish it were true for me, and maybe someday it will be. But not soon. And for my wife, never. Her relationship with our alma mater basically ended April 1, 2007.
  • T26E4T26E4 Posts: 16,582Registered User Senior Member
    Maybe I'm being naive. But from my years of recruiting, I can clearly see my kid making it or not making it. While I can hope, I know that, assuming all things being equal, my kid has still a smallish chance. I think I'm settled with that. I dunno.
  • siserunesiserune Posts: 1,625Registered User Senior Member
    toughyear wrote:
    The affirmative action suppresses asian american admissions.
    Just look at the Yale number (Fall 2009) ... 69% white, 14% asian american, 9% african american, 8% Hispanic ... I wouldn't be surprised if the proportion of applicants is more than double the proportion of this incoming class for asian americans.

    Last year's numbers for MIT were provided by an admissions officer, and showed Asians being admitted at a rate higher than their proportion in the applicant pool. Asians accounted for 26 percent of applicants... and 30 percent of acceptances. For comparison, something like 19 percent of applicants were black/Hispanic and this accounted for 24 percent of acceptances. Apparently whites, not Asians, had the lowest rate of admission relative to number of applications.

    http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/9899004-post8.html
  • beatlesdisturbedbeatlesdisturbed Posts: 362Registered User Junior Member
    ^But in all reality, Asians tend to be the most qualified candidates.
  • toughyeartoughyear Posts: 331Registered User Member
    The following is the Wikipedia description about the "Jewish quota". Substitute every word "Jewish" by "Asian" and the same description works fairly well for Today's situation of Asian American students applying for College.
    ===============
    Jewish quota - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jewish quota was a percentage that limited the number of Jews in various establishments. In particular, in 19th and 20th centuries some countries had Jewish quotas for higher education, a special case of Numerus clausus.

    Jewish educational quotas could be state-wide law or adopted only in certain institutions, often unofficially. The limitation took the form of total prohibition of Jewish students, or of limiting the number of Jewish students so that their share in the students' population would not be larger than their share in the general population. In some establishments, the Jewish quota placed a limit on growth rather than set a fixed level of participation to be achieved.

    According to historian David Oshinsky, on writing about Jonas Salk, "Most of the surrounding medical schools—Cornell, Columbia, Pennsylvania, and Yale—had rigid quotas in place. In 1935 Yale accepted 76 applicants from a pool of 501. About 200 of those applicants were Jewish and only five got in." He notes that the dean's instructions were remarkably precise: "Never admit more than five Jews, take only two Italian Catholics, and take no blacks at all." As a result, Oshinsky added, "Jonas Salk and hundreds like him ..." enrolled in NYU instead.[1]

    Jews who wanted an education used various ways to overcome this discrimination: bribing the authorities, changing their religion, or traveling to countries without such limitations. In Hungary, for example, 5,000 Jewish youngsters (including Edward Teller) left the country after the introduction of Numerus Clausus. One American who fell victim to the Jewish quota was late physicist and Nobel laureate Richard P. Feynman, who was turned away from Columbia College in the 1930s and went to MIT instead.
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