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2,032 admitted to Class of ’16

gibbygibby Posts: 5,079Registered User Senior Member
edited March 2012 in Harvard University
2,032 admitted to Class of ?16 | Harvard Gazette

Letters and email notifications of admission to Harvard College were sent today to 2,032 students, 5.9 percent of the applicant pool of 34,302.

With the return of Early Action this year, it is more difficult than in the past to predict how many admitted students will accept Harvard’s offer of admission. “We have always been conservative about the number of acceptances sent out at this time of year in order to avoid the possibility of overcrowding. Harvard’s high graduation rate — typically 97 to 98 percent — leaves little margin for error,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “As always, we expect to use the waiting list, and in some recent years as many as 200 students have been admitted in May and June.”

“This year’s applicant pool was remarkable by any standard in its academic and extracurricular excellence,” said Fitzsimmons. More than 14,000 scored 700 or above on the SAT critical reading test; 17,000 scored 700 or above on the SAT math test; 15,000 scored 700 or higher on the SAT writing test; and 3,800 were ranked first in their high school classes.
Post edited by gibby on

Replies to: 2,032 admitted to Class of ’16

  • persmanpersman Posts: 53Registered User Junior Member
    Just for comparison, the class of 2013 got a 7% acceptance rate, 2014 6.9%, 2015 6.2%, and 2016 5.9%.
  • WindCloudUltraWindCloudUltra Posts: 1,761Registered User Senior Member
    My class had an admit rate of 9.1%.
  • WindCloudUltraWindCloudUltra Posts: 1,761Registered User Senior Member
    Wait. That can't be right. The 2,032 number also includes e 600-700 or so from Early Action right? So the actual number of acceptances sent out yesterday is somewhere along the lines of 1,400?
  • gibbygibby Posts: 5,079Registered User Senior Member
  • ewhoewho Posts: 1,151Registered User Senior Member
    We should see about 40-80 students will be accepted from the waitlist.
  • WindCloudUltraWindCloudUltra Posts: 1,761Registered User Senior Member
    So that first sentence of the Gazette article is technically not correct, since the early action acceptances were sent several months ago.

    So RD rate ~4.19%.

    Wow.
  • gibbygibby Posts: 5,079Registered User Senior Member
    ^^ Lower. The Crimson article calculated the RD rate at 3.8 percent.

    "The admit rate for those considered under regular decision, including the 2,838 early action candidates who were deferred to the original round, was 3.8 percent."
  • WindCloudUltraWindCloudUltra Posts: 1,761Registered User Senior Member
    Ah ok. I didn't have the number of deferrals...
    Makes sense.
  • HarvardParentHarvardParent Posts: 184Registered User Junior Member
    The number of total admission seems to be calculated with a yield rate of 90% for EA and 77% for RD. I think both would be really close to the real yield rates and there will be very few people coming off the waitlist. It the yield for EA is as high Fitz thinks it would be, they may have to ask people to take a gap year.
  • ewhoewho Posts: 1,151Registered User Senior Member
    It does not matter as you are over-thinking on this. The "overall" yield tells you that they are counting down the yield from 1670/2032 = 82% to lower. For 81%, they will take 30 students from the waitlist; for 80%, they will take 55 students.
  • ewhoewho Posts: 1,151Registered User Senior Member
    So Stanford does not think that its yield is going to change much.


    Admission News : Stanford University

    If Harvard's yield stays the same, Harvard will take 165 students, like what the Dean said.
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