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How many people get into harvard has a SAT of 2400?

TK_GNUSTK_GNUS Posts: 69Registered User Junior Member
edited February 2012 in Harvard University
and how may got 2300+?
Post edited by TK_GNUS on
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Replies to: How many people get into harvard has a SAT of 2400?

  • tokenadulttokenadult Posts: 17,473Super Moderator Senior Member
    No more than 200-some.

    http://professionals.collegeboard.com/profdownload/sat_percentile_ranks_2008_composite_cr_m_w.pdf

    There have been fewer than 300 students who score 2400 in each recent year. And perhaps not all of those students even apply to Harvard, although I'm sure many do. In other words, the majority of students in Harvard's entering class of about 1600 students each year scored less than 2400 on the SAT. And it's quite likely that each year some sizeable number of students who have a 2400, but lack other desirable characteristics, are not offered admission at whatever their favorite college is.

    http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/parents-forum/377882-how-do-top-scorers-tests-fail-gain-admission-top-schools.html
  • gadadgadad Posts: 7,752Registered User Senior Member
    Several posters on the Harvard board have quoted a statistic that fewer than 50% of applicants with 2400 are accepted. While I don't know the source of that statistic, it seems logical since the overall rate is 7% and a 2400 is not truly indicative of any greater mastery than, say, a 2300. Having not been weeded out on the basis of SAT (and perhaps having earned some moderate extra consideration), 2400s are still obliged to demonstrate that they bring other qualities and assets.
  • coureurcoureur Posts: 11,386Registered User Senior Member
    I've seen the 50% admittance rate for 2400-scoring applicants quoted for Princeton (see example below), and I think people often extrapolate that to Harvard and Yale as well.

    Yale Daily News - Anti-Asian bias alleged

    Excerpt:

    '“We consider applicants as individuals and the University does not discriminate against Asian Americans,” she said. “It’s difficult to admit a class from among thousands of excellent applicants.”
    Cliatt said Princeton admitted approximately half of all applicants with perfect SAT scores last year.'
  • milessmilesmilessmiles Posts: 405Registered User Member
    Out of 294 2400's, I'd imagine that about 250 would apply to Harvard, 120 would get in, and about 80 would attend.

    Is 2400 in a separate tier? Is there a kind of cutoff around 2370/2380 where scores would be considered on the same level of 2400?

    The thread tokenadult posted is always a great read.
  • mammallmammall Posts: 1,701- Senior Member
    If it's of any interest, as the parent of a 2400 and a 36, I am NOT stressing those achievements with my second child coming up. I am telling her to truly enjoy her classes, take risks, and know that a great college awaits her.
  • kwukwu Posts: 4,759Registered User Senior Member
    Relevance of previous post, besides bragging about dual perfect scores?

    The point of the matter is, 2400s don't guarantee admission to any particular institution, but having one certainly raises one's chances at admissions to at least one of the best ones.
  • gadadgadad Posts: 7,752Registered User Senior Member
    If you've got one kid doing what Mammall's is doing, and kid #2 following a couple years behind, it's very relevant. Celebrating # 1's achievements while keeping it all in perspective for a #2 you love and admire just as much is a balancing act.
  • monstor344monstor344 Posts: 2,502Registered User Senior Member
    If it's of any interest, as the parent of a 2400 and a 36, I am NOT stressing those achievements with my second child coming up. I am telling her to truly enjoy her classes, take risks, and know that a great college awaits her.
    Congrats to your first child, but just curious; why did he/she take both tests?
  • MillancadMillancad Posts: 5,941Registered User Senior Member
    ^ At my school, almost everyone takes both tests, no matter the scores. I know one girl with a 36 and a 2390.
  • fledglingfledgling Posts: 4,256- Senior Member
    In response to the original question, I think the figure's somewhere around 40-50%.
  • mifunemifune Posts: 2,756Registered User Senior Member
    I really do not believe that it is important to take both tests since doing so does not necessarily provide you with any subsequent increases in admission chances. Truly, the ACT is not as highly regarded by elite institutions as the SAT. But of course, for those in the Midwest, particularly residents of Illinois, the ACT is often a common rite of passage.

    I personally would estimate a 2400 "hook-less" candidate's chances as somewhere around 35% considering the high competition this year.
  • jamesfordjamesford Posts: 3,447Registered User Senior Member
    Truly, the ACT is not as highly regarded by elite institutions as the SAT.

    Your source?

    FWIW I didn't take the ACT so no, I am not biased towards it.
  • mifunemifune Posts: 2,756Registered User Senior Member
    This is from Princeton's website:

    "The SAT is strongly preferred, but ACT (with Writing) scores are accepted."

    Princeton University | Admissions Facts and Statistics

    In addition, SAT score profiles are the more commonly listed in admission profiles and follow a more specific scale. For HYP, in which the SAT scores are around 2360-2375 at the 75th percentile, this appears far more impressive than a 35 on the ACT given the larger scoring range between the two tests.
  • ArzachelArzachel Posts: 344Registered User Member
    I have a 2400 and still don't expect to get in.
  • ronealdroneald Posts: 710Registered User Member
    Congrats to your first child, but just curious; why did he/she take both tests?

    Just a thought but they mightve taken both in the same month and not had either score when they took either test; this was my case (I wouldn't have taken both if I had either of my scores in the other).
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