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EPGY's Multivariable Calc

freeflyerfreeflyer Posts: 48Registered User Junior Member
edited July 2007 in High School Life
Has anyone taken the multivariable caclulus course through EPGY?
Is it hard and how do they grade? (given that there are only 3 take-home exams in a semester)
It'd be great if any EPGY veteran can share because I might take it next year after i'm done with BC.
Post edited by freeflyer on
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Replies to: EPGY's Multivariable Calc

  • fizixfizix Posts: 1,813Registered User Senior Member
    I've taken other EPGY courses (they grade quite easily).
  • InquilineKeaInquilineKea Posts: 2,309- Member
    Have you noticed how Multivariable Calculus is split into two, even though it isn't split in two in a typical college curriculum?

    I'd like an answer to that.

    Because obviously, a single half can't count for credit at a college. Moreover, it's only a few chapters at the end of a standard calculus textbook.

    http://epgy.stanford.edu/courses/math/M52A/

    ROFL, Partial Derivatives is at lecture 35!! Before that, it's vectors/parameterizations/surfaces
    ==
    Anyways, there are alternatives. Holy crap, CTY has multivariable now:
    http://cty.jhu.edu/cde/math/courses/multivariable.html

    My old catalogs didn't have it. I want to magically become younger. Aggh!!
    ==
    How good are you at math? You might find the courses at http://www.artofproblemsolving.com more rewarding. I wish my parents weren't so stingy.
  • fizixfizix Posts: 1,813Registered User Senior Member
    Hm, well I'd assume they get more money for two courses than for one...
    Just my cynical approach to things.
  • iostreamiostream Posts: 575Registered User Member
    the epgy course in mvc is all computational nonsense. if you're more interested in the theoretical basis of mathematics, the epgy course will give you little insight into the fundamental structure underlying multivariable calculus.
  • InquilineKeaInquilineKea Posts: 2,309- Member
    the epgy course in mvc is all computational nonsense. if you're more interested in the theoretical basis of mathematics, the epgy course will give you little insight into the fundamental structure underlying multivariable calculus.

    And unfortunately, you don't have an option unless you live near an university and manage to convince its admins to take the course. Honestly, the best option for you is to self-study, but the problem is that self-study hardly shows on a transcript (and universities don't like it when you've prematurely stopped taking courses).

    In any case, read http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Resources/AoPS_R_A_Calculus.php
  • ActuarialDJActuarialDJ Posts: 421Registered User Member
    I'm in it right now

    M52A MV Diff Calc

    My moms just told me the other day I better finish the course
    but I am only like 25-30% done with it
    and I have until April 31st

    Pray for me
  • mochamavenmochamaven Posts: 878Registered User Member
    I agree with iostream. The course is mostly vector algebra...the only real multivariable calc comes in in the last 10 or so lectures.
  • 09xoxo09xoxo Posts: 652Registered User Member
    So would you guys say to go with the CTY course instead?
  • InquilineKeaInquilineKea Posts: 2,309- Member
    CTY's is similar, it's computational. Moreover, it's highly unlikely that an university will award credit for the course. It depends on what you want to do in the future. Pure math, go with artofproblemsolving.com courses. If you don't have much time or want to do something else, go with the CTY course (seeing that it isn't split into two). Hell, CTY gets its material from EPGY
  • juniorinhsjuniorinhs Posts: 645Registered User Member
    haha, I have my last test today.
    I really only took it because the local universities rejected my attempts to take courses because of my age and it was the only option that seemed feasible come September when I didn't have a math class.
    It's ok, but by independent study, it really is independent study-the tutor acts more as a grader. But they do grade the tests with extensive feedback--now if only one were allowed to keep a copy of the test to know what they're giving feedback on.
    One really has to convince oneself to keep working on it. Most people that I know of, including myself, end up in a situation like ActurialDJ's, where we end up cram-learning the material to finish the course in time.
    I'm definitely going to have to retake it in college.
    See if you can find something else first.
  • InquilineKeaInquilineKea Posts: 2,309- Member
    But they do grade the tests with extensive feedback--now if only one were allowed to keep a copy of the test to know what they're giving feedback on.

    They don't allow you to keep a copy of the test?!? But they send it online, don't they? Can't you just use print screen on the test?

    And even if they send the test by mail, you could just scan it.

    I know CTY sends ALL of the course materials in the mail on the first day of the course, which was interesting. ^_^ That was Honors Geometry, back in 2003-2004.
  • InquilineKeaInquilineKea Posts: 2,309- Member
    Anyways, if you don't anticipate credit for EPGY/CTY (note, most prestigious universities don't award credit for EPGY), the http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Classroom/AoPS_Classroom.php courses give you a lot more value out of your money (I've heard a lot better reviews of it). You get to interact with peers and you get a lot more instructor feedback (plus a virtual classroom)

    There are other helpful sources too:

    http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Forum/viewtopic.php?t=133510
    http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/Forum/viewtopic.php?t=40984

    But go for CTY Multivariable Calc if you aren't that comfortable with your math ability (since those taking AoPS courses tend to be VERY math-oriented). If you're more into the other sciences and just happen to be ahead, you might get intimidated by the AoPSers (and AoPS standards).

    ==
    EDIT: interesting, freeflyer and 09xoxo are both SSP acceptees. ^_^ I just looked through the SSP threads. Ah, the times. Heh, I posted 73 times in the old 2005 SSP thread but I was a sophomore rejectee. I was thinking of doing EPGY multivariable calc during that summer but got into a math program.
  • juniorinhsjuniorinhs Posts: 645Registered User Member
    No, you are not allowed to keep a copy of your test or your responses. Any documentation that isn't sent to them must be destroyed after the examination. They have very strict testing rules.
  • portmanteauportmanteau Posts: 29Registered User New Member
    say, how do the courses work anyhow? i want to apply for a physics one over the summer, but i'm not sure how to. does the course have a specific time? do you take the lesson when you want? or does you take the class when the lessons tell you to?

    oh , if i wasn't making myself clear, i wanted to take an e-learning class. thanks!
  • InquilineKeaInquilineKea Posts: 2,309- Member
    Damn. That really hurts.

    ==

    As for you, portmanteau, can you please navigate your way through http://epgy.stanford.edu or http://cty.jhu.edu ? It isn't so hard to get to distance learning from those base sites. You could also try merely self-studying for the AP Physics C or B exam and pay nothing for it (this is quite doable)
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