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In Need of Advice

Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
I'm a high school student, and I have a great passion for medicine. However, hearing stories about how difficult it is to become a doctor, I often find myself not feeling very confident. I'm a sophomore and, so far, I have straight As. However, I'm having a bit of a hard time in physics. Will this dampen my chances of becoming a doctor? Also, will it matter to highly ranked schools, like Ivy Leagues, that I haven't had research or any science awards, or that I have trouble with physics? What extracurriculars could I do that deal with medicine in high school (other than volunteering at the library)?

Thanks in advance!
Post edited by Olive_Tree on
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Replies to: In Need of Advice

  • SHS_SpartanSHS_Spartan Registered User Posts: 943 Member
    Well about the physics dilemma...I know it's a requirement for med school, but I don't think it's prevalent in medicine (I could be completely wrong). Just try to get an A in the class.

    As for ECs...volunteer at a hospital, or shadow some doctors.
    Try joining clubs too, that are science related. (Biology, Chemistry, etc.)

    Hope this helped.
  • LuckMC11LuckMC11 Registered User Posts: 807 Member
    whats shadowing?
  • dk92487dk92487 Registered User Posts: 54 Junior Member
    Unless you want to apply to a BS/MD program (where you get accepted to undergrad and med school at the same time) you don't have to worry that you're trouble in High School Physics will affect your chances of being a doctor. Once you're in college you will notice a great adjustment in your study habits (if you really want to be a doctor) and you may find that you can handle physics.

    Shadowing involves following a doctor around for a few days and just observing what they do. You probably will not get to have any actually physical interactions with patients and will sit in the corner and watch. This is important to do in your undergrad years as medical schools want to see that you have "tested the waters" and seen what being a doctor is really like. As a High School student, I really don't think it is essential for you to do a lot of shadowing at this point. But it may be good for you to spend a day or two with a doctor that you might know to see if all the hardwork you're going to have to do in the future is worth it.

    Hope this helps, good luck.
  • LuckMC11LuckMC11 Registered User Posts: 807 Member
    alright...thanks!
  • blondegurl2007blondegurl2007 Registered User Posts: 35 Junior Member
    try finding a nurses aide training program, ive been doing it through my high school, and you get to experience the hospital and nursing home settings through job shadows and clinicals in which you actually get to work with patients. It gives you a way to see if you will really like working in the medical field. Another thing that ive done that you might enjoy, you may have to be older though, idk but im getting certified as a phlebotomist to be ale to draw blood, its like 1 or 2 semesters at a CC. Just try to work hard, and get some experience being in a hospital
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    So it will not matter to Ivy Leagues that even though I want to be a doctor, I don't have any prestigious science awards or any research?

    -By the way, I meant hospital, not library.
  • bluedevilmikebluedevilmike Registered User Posts: 11,964 Senior Member
    Are you asking about undergrad admission?
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    No, I'm talking about medical school admission.
  • bluedevilmikebluedevilmike Registered User Posts: 11,964 Senior Member
    Then nobody cares what you did or didn't do in high school.
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    Would undergraduate universities care, like Ivy Leagues?
  • bluedevilmikebluedevilmike Registered User Posts: 11,964 Senior Member
    Yes. Science awards and research are great things you could have done. They are rare enough that they are not mandatory for undergrad admissions -- i.e. lots of kids get in having done yearbook, or newspaper, etc. instead.
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    Thanks for the help everyone. I have a few more questions I hope you guys can help me with. How do you go about doing research? Are there any requirements? How do you approach a professor or a research organization?

    Thank you
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    Bump...

    (10 char.)
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    I've also encountered a problem because in the application to be a hospital volunteer, I need a reference from a neighbor, but I don't know any of my neighbors personally. What should I do?
  • Olive_TreeOlive_Tree Registered User Posts: 3,108 Senior Member
    Please reply. If I can't volunteer at a hospital because I need a neighbor's reference and I don't know any of my neighbors, will this hurt me when applying to college even though they'll know i'm interested in medicine?
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