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Parent as homeschool supervisor and college admissions

FreenchyFreenchy Posts: 54Registered User Junior Member
edited November 2012 in Home Schooling and College
Hi everyone,

I am an international student from France who has been in attending a public high school her whole life but for my senior year, I've decided to switch to homeschooling so I can conduct humanitarian projects abroad. I have all the credits required for the equivalent of a US High School Diploma and to graduate from school here in France, I will just have to pass the leaving examination in June.
So, I will be home schooled for the remainder of the year and was wondering how it works with Admissions offices. I have applied EA to the school of my dream and they will probably ask for a mid-year report at some point. This may sound strange but how much are they willing to trust grades reported on this supplement ? If my dad is my supervisor, he is free to put whatever he wants on this technically, right ?
Don't get me wrong, my goal is not to cheat and report fake grades but I don't see how this is fair compared to a traditional high school supervisor.

Thank for you anyone who's got information on that !
LeA
Post edited by Freenchy on

Replies to: Parent as homeschool supervisor and college admissions

  • marblingmarbling Posts: 158Registered User Junior Member
    Technically, yes, your parent can put whatever they want. Many schools do not require information above what is required from any other applicant, although some schools might have an additional requirement for SATII tests or more.

    Your schools will likely want to see some sort of transcript. Some schools are pickier than others. Most homeschooled students will provide this; your dad can make one on his computer easily. To speak the colleges' language, ours said "Official Homeschool Transcript" across the top and included a blurb at the bottom about being in accordance with our state's homeschool law. I have heard that some schools want the transcript sent in a signed/sealed envelope, although that was not the case with any of D's schools.

    Your ACT or SAT scores (of if you are international, what is it, TOEFL??) will support your grades. Many schools also prefer a letter of recommendation from an outside source.

    The schools to which my D applied had varying comments. One school has an optional testing entrance, but homeschoolers must test. That same school also has an admissions counselor specifically assigned to homeschooled applicants (instead of someone just assigned to our state). I also sent in a lengthy packet of course descriptions, as the school told me it would accept anything that would place my D in a more favorable light.

    Two other schools told me that they would use my D's community college teacher's letter of recommendation as her one permitted letter. Since the letter I wrote was a combination of our homeschool philosophy and recommendation/evaluation of my D, it would still be accepted because of the "philosophy" part.

    You said you don't see how this is fair. What's not fair? There are tens of thousands of high schools across the country, both public and private. Some are similar, but most are not equal across the board.
  • FreenchyFreenchy Posts: 54Registered User Junior Member
    Thank you for the insight !
    My applications are already done and since I was attending a public a high school until this year, I have all transcripts and letters of recommendation. I was just wondering for the mid-year/final school report !
    So as long as everything is explained clearly, my dad can be my supervisor and no admissions office would ask for further information ? (meaning grades). When you said sometimes it required to have envelopes sealed, what do you mean exactly ? If I am not related to any school, how can I have a stamped/sealed envelope ?
    Like I said, my application is already complete so I shouldn't have too many issues I was just wondering how homeschooled applicants and admissions offices worked !

    Thank you again !
  • marblingmarbling Posts: 158Registered User Junior Member
    >>> my dad can be my supervisor and no admissions office would ask for further information ?

    Yes.

    >>> When you said sometimes it required to have envelopes sealed, what do you mean exactly ? If I am not related to any school, how can I have a stamped/sealed envelope ?

    If necessary, you can take an envelope, write your return address on it and include the word "homeschool," and have your dad sign across the back of the envelope where it is sealed. I know, it sounds silly, this was suggested in a homeschool transcript book I used (by Lee Binz).

    :)
  • FreenchyFreenchy Posts: 54Registered User Junior Member
    Thank you again for all the information !
  • readabook123readabook123 Posts: 13Registered User New Member
    My son was homeschooled through high school and got into University of Pennsylvania with my detailed transcript. They wanted it "sealed and signed", too. I decided to use an educational consultant and she submitted the mid-year and final grade reports. She also sent the transcript, which added a level of objectivity to mom's opinion. Depending on where you live and how competitive the school that you want to attend is, you might consider springing for someone else to submit the app for you .....a "counselor"? Just a thought ....
  • sbjdorlosbjdorlo Posts: 3,270Registered User Senior Member
    I (the homeschool mom) never did this; I just signed my transcripts electronically and sent them to all my son's schools, either via the Common App or via snail mail. He was admitted to Princeton, Penn, MIT, Caltech, Mudd, Vandy, and some others. It seems whatever the school wants is what you should do.
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