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How do you list a promotion on a job application?

cantwaittill2013cantwaittill2013 Posts: 9Registered User New Member
I got my first job this summer as a dishwasher at the restaurant my mom works at. Now they are offering me a job as a waitress and they are willing to work with my school schedule which is great because I'm starting my freshman year of college in a few weeks, majoring in engineering. I just want to know how I would put this into a job application for when I apply for internships or maybe another job in the future. Would I list them as separate jobs with the same employer, taking up two of the slots, or as one job, waitress, since they are the same employer and just including my time as dishwasher as total time employed?

I've filled out a lot of applications but never gotten a job offer. I finally got this job because my mom put in a good word for me. I really don't know what I'm doing when it comes to job applications, so I assume I'm doing it wrong. Any help you could give me at all would be appreciated.
Post edited by cantwaittill2013 on

Replies to: How do you list a promotion on a job application?

  • turtlerockturtlerock Posts: 1,118Registered User Senior Member
    IMO, if it's a completely different position (not an increase in pay for doing the same duties and having the same responsibilities), then list them as separate jobs with the same employer.

    In the military, I had like 4 different billets over 4 years. I didn't want to put "Military for 4 years" because it's a little broad, and just one billet wouldn't encompass all the skills I could present to an employer. I think it would be odd if you list the responsibility of "washing dishes" under the position title of waitress. If I had seen it, I would be thinking, "Uh, isn't that what the dish washer does?" Obviously I would conclude that you had, in fact, been in both positions, but only after I would have backtracked to understand it.

    It's the same thing generally, IMO. If I were a store clerk for a year, but then was promoted to that store's manager for another year, I wouldn't list that I was a store manager for 2 years and also have the duties or responsibilities of a clerk under that position - they may assume I was performing duties of a manger and a clerk at the same time, which IMO is misleading.

    EDIT: Once you start to claim some more work exp through internships or other jobs, then you'll realize that you may not need to include dish washer or even waitress depending on how you're trying to focus your resume to a specific employer or position.

    For example, if you're a chem major interviewing for a lab job after graduation (assuming you have a couple internships by the point), you may want to leave off the dish washing/waitressing gig all together and really focus on the chem internships you have over the last several years. If in the interview they ask you something like, "So, you're resume didn't show anything before your Sophomore year of college. Were you only focusing on studies at that time, or trying to find out what you were interested in?" You could simply reply with something like, "Well actually I was waitressing thorugh my Freshman year from a job I had secured the Summer before. I really liked the people I worked with and liked working together with them to make our resturant a great experience for people, but by Sophomore year I began to get involved with things that were more along the lines of my career interests."
  • cantwaittill2013cantwaittill2013 Posts: 9Registered User New Member
    Thank you so much, you have no idea how clueless I am about applications, resumes, and interviews. I have a good work ethic and I do my very best at every task giving to me, which is why I hope was promoted, but somehow it is really hard for me to convey that on a piece I paper enough for someone to let me prove it to them. Knowing that gives me a lot of anxiety for securing a job after graduation.
  • turtlerockturtlerock Posts: 1,118Registered User Senior Member
    but somehow it is really hard for me to convey that on a piece I paper enough for someone to let me prove it to them. Knowing that gives me a lot of anxiety for securing a job after graduation.
    Be sure to stop by your school's career center on campus frequently. They should have services set up to help you create your resume and even do mock job interviews to go over interviewing techniques.
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