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Fraternity membership on a resume

brassmonkeybrassmonkey Posts: 1,491Registered User Senior Member
Does fraternity membership belong on a resume? I'm an officer in my fraternity, but am trying to figure this out. If so, where would it go?
Post edited by brassmonkey on

Replies to: Fraternity membership on a resume

  • HARVtoWALLHARVtoWALL Posts: 72Registered User Junior Member
    Of course you can put any position you hold on your resume. It should definitely be included if it’s an honor or academically related frat.

    But then again I have come across some BS positions frats make up to improve people’s resumes example:

    Person A: So what are you?
    Person B: Risk Management Associate! (We have 5 of these)
    Person A: So what do you do in the frat?
    Person B: It’s complicated but basically I set up a video related to some risk we face (like fire, and safety related). At these events there needs to be a minimum of one person attending which is normally me by myself.
    Person A: Righhhhht???


    Keep in mind that resumes are made for employeers, so you'll be explaining what you do to them. And make sure it helps your cause.

    Just to be curious what is your official position title???
  • CaliGuy07CaliGuy07 Posts: 419Registered User Member
    If you have something positive and a story to tell, list it.
  • brassmonkeybrassmonkey Posts: 1,491Registered User Senior Member
    secretary
    we only have president,vice-president, treasurer and secretary
  • PeterY321PeterY321 Posts: 57Registered User Junior Member
    Don't put it on. Honestly unless you're president or VP to show sociability and likability, being a secretary in a frat is not that great of an extracurricular. I understand that you may have contributed a lot but there are a lot of inherent stereotypes in the business.
  • secretfiresecretfire Posts: 72Registered User Junior Member
    I agree with Peter. My frat has "chair" positions that do work like social, service, and academics chair. I'm the service chair so I decided to put that on my resume to highlight my philanthropy spirit. We all know the stereotypes of Greek Life. But yeah...secretary in my organization is just a dude who goes to eboard and takes minutes in a very informal setting. Leadership titles do mean alot to sell your extracurriculars on a 1-page resume in a huge stack of 1-page resumes. Run for president or vp next semester (or year).
  • tinytonytinytony Posts: 42Registered User Junior Member
    do you not have anything else to put on your resume?
  • brassmonkeybrassmonkey Posts: 1,491Registered User Senior Member
    yeah i ended up leaving it off
  • ice0man6ice0man6 Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    i'm starting a frat at my school where would be the best place to go to find the all the duties and responsibilities for President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary.
  • giants92giants92 Posts: 1,338Registered User Senior Member
    Are you creating a brand new fraternity? Or are you founding a new chapter of an existing fraternity? If it's the latter, try to get in touch with nationals. They would provide you with guidance. If it's the former, try to seek out a few presidents on campus and see what different fraternities call their different positions and what their responsibilities are.
  • drwhofan1drwhofan1 Posts: 29Registered User New Member
    DS put frat VP on his resume.

    I think it hurt him.

    The chapter at his frat had a bad incident 12 years ago that pops up on the first page of Google. Of course, it had nothing to do with him, but it may have been a case of guilt by association.
  • ag54ag54 Posts: 2,909Registered User Senior Member
    My son put his fraternity involvement on his resume and it helped tremendously! In a couple of cases, it was instrumental in getting his foot in the door.

    I think it really depends on the type of job you're going for and the climate of the organizations.
  • ThanolThanol Posts: 194Registered User Junior Member
    It also probably depends how you spin it. If it's a one liner with no explaination, it probably doesn't do too much good.
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