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Employee benefits at working at an ivy

impoppinimpoppin Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
What are some that offered to employees?

Replies to: Employee benefits at working at an ivy

  • impoppinimpoppin Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
    This is not inclusive of being a professor. Rather this includes working at a food service place and other jobs of the like.
  • AMadWalrusAMadWalrus Registered User Posts: 16 New Member
    How did you post in this sub-topic? Unless the website is glitching for only me?
  • impoppinimpoppin Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
    @AMadWalrus I have no clue?
  • SyrxisSyrxis Registered User Posts: 224 Junior Member
    @AMadWalrus Looks like if I go to this url: http://talk.collegeconfidential.com/post/discussion/ivy-league, it lets me make a new discussion although I don't know if it'll let me post it because I haven't tried.
  • hamsterbanehamsterbane Registered User Posts: 15 New Member
    You can search for this college by college, for example here: https://hr.cornell.edu/summaries-benefits

    If you're wondering if you could attend and earn a degree for free or cheap that way, the answer is "eventually, maybe." I knew quite a few secretaries, admissions officers, etc who earned BS and MS degrees at my (non-Ivy) undergrad school. I have always thought that was a creative way to make your way through college.

    However, note that not everyone with a job on a college campus actually works *for* the college. You mention food service and similar positions.... I don't know for sure, but that seems like the sort of job that is probably either contracted out or set aside for work study or current students. You might need to aim a little higher in the employment ladder to earn the high value benefits described in the link above.
  • impoppinimpoppin Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
    @hamsterbane thank you. Do you anything else about other ivies/top schools? Just to clarify, as an employee would you still have to apply the traditional route to be able to get a degree?
  • CheddarcheeseMNCheddarcheeseMN Registered User Posts: 2,390 Senior Member
    Yes, you would need to apply like other students apply. The idea is that there might be a tuition subsidy for employees.
  • hamsterbanehamsterbane Registered User Posts: 15 New Member
    The Cornell link I posted confirms that yes you would need to apply and be accepted if you wanted to be in a degree program. There are also rules that the degree should be related to your work for the college, that your supervisors would have to sign off on the benefit, and that you only take a few classes at a time. You would be an actual employee, not a student with a job.
  • impoppinimpoppin Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
    @hamsterbane do you know of any other schools that let you take classes/ get a degree as long as you work there?
  • hamsterbanehamsterbane Registered User Posts: 15 New Member
    Sorry, but there's no Common App for this -- just the separate HR offices of the 4000ish colleges in the United States. Start with the ones near where you live. The job listings are not hard to find, but if you don't have a college degree many of them are above your current level. Can't afford to be picky.
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