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Chances of getting into law school

ksu2013ksu2013 Posts: 3Registered User New Member
edited April 2012 in Law School
I'm currently attending a public university, and will graduate in three years with a degree in Economics. My GPA will be a 3.8 (not LSDAS adjusted) when I submit my applications. I am taking the LSAT this summer, on my first cold try I got a 158, obviously I plan on studying and am hoping to bring that up. I don't have that many extra-cirriculars, I am in a few clubs but don't hold any leadership positions. I am also studying abroad (although I don't know that that really helps my chances). I was wondering if I had a chance at getting into a good law school. Obviously not the top ten, but at least top 50. I've been looking at law school numbers and it has me feeling quite inadequate.
Post edited by ksu2013 on

Replies to: Chances of getting into law school

  • XaviFMXaviFM Posts: 952Registered User Member
    How important are those extra curricular's?
  • ksu2013ksu2013 Posts: 3Registered User New Member
    I am involved in Mock Trial, Students for Environmental Action, Amnesty International, and Economics club. I also have had a job all throughout my undergrad. Also, I found out that my LSDAS GPA should be a 3.87 when I apply.
  • LaBarristerLaBarrister Posts: 168Registered User Junior Member
    ksu2013, as you must already be aware of if you spent at least 10 minutes on LSN, you have a prime chance to get into a T14 law school. If you do graduate with a 3.8, then your only obstacle will be your 158 LSAT score. If you do indeed have the next three years to study for this, then study for it and bring your score up. Study hard and get a 170+ (based off LSN, 170+ seems to be liked amongst the T14's) and you have a likely shot at getting multiple T14's accepting your applications (again, according to LSN). So, you see, I have a hard time understanding why LSN has left you feeling inadequate. The only thing I can think of is that you are worried about your LSAT score, which you have three years to improve upon.

    If you notice that I mention nothing else with regards to EC’s and LOR’s and such, it is because they do not matter for those with high numbers. If you want to get into a good law school, do not settle – keep you GPA where it is and study up for the LSAT. Getting into a good law school is a relatively simple formula.
  • muckdogs07muckdogs07 Posts: 1,166Registered User Senior Member
    Unlike college, ECs generally are not as important for law schools as (1) LSAT, (2) school, and (3) grades in about that order (Going to Harvard etc cannot make up for a 2.5 GPA, but there are plenty of students at T14 with high LSATs, but relatively average grades (say 3.3 to 3.6 range).

    As a practicing lawyer (DOJ trial lawyer, and Duke law graduate) take as many writing courses as you can. If you write well, you can last at most large firms for a decade and will be attractive for government and corporate employers.
  • ksu2013ksu2013 Posts: 3Registered User New Member
    Thanks for your advice LaBarrister. You're right I'm mostly worried about my LSAT. I am currently a junior. I didn't decide to go to law school until this fall. I also recently changed my major which is letting me graduate in 3 years, a year earlier than planned. I am planning on taking the LSAT in June, maybe in October if I need to. I also thought LSDAS would bring my GPA down because my A's were often A-'s but then I found out that since my school doesn't report -/+ on transcripts that my GPA will be unharmed.

    Do you think its possible to improve my LSAT score so much in such a short time period? I think one of my big problems is that I lose focus during the test. I am hoping that will change on test day since its the actual test and I will be forced to focus.
  • LaBarristerLaBarrister Posts: 168Registered User Junior Member
    I tell you what, kus2013, you will have to do the following things to your best on test day:

    (1) Develop the ability to focus, really focus, on what you are doing without distractions for long periods of time. Seeing as the test is generally 4 hours (or is it not?) - in any case, practice this period of focus for however long the test is.

    (2) Let us kill two birds with one stone: use this time developing your focus skills to study for the LSAT itself. I would suggest that you spend at least 3 4-hour periods each week studying for the LSAT in a controlled environment. Do not let your friends or family distract you during those times. Personally, I have multiple practice exams on file that I could send you so you could actually measure your increase in abilities as the next two months go by. If you e-mail me at c.a.labarber@**********, I will be happy to share them with you :) I even have the solutions written out - but do not use these as a crutch!

    This is the best advice I can give you aside from the following: if you want something bad enough, nothing is impossible. Keep that in mind while studying for the LSAT. Best of luck in your journey to become an attorney!

    Also, do not focus on your score (i.e., the outcome) because doing so will only distract you, and it will not make your score any higher! Instead, focus on the experience. Focus on the why and the how, and the rest will take care of itself.
  • LaBarristerLaBarrister Posts: 168Registered User Junior Member
    Okay - it is at the Google e-mail. Are we not supposed to share e-mail addresses on this thing, or something?
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