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JD MBA Programs

icefreeze57icefreeze57 Posts: 5Registered User New Member
edited April 2012 in Law School
Hi,

So Im currently undergrad earning a Poly Sci BA with a P-re Law concentration and a history and business minor. I can grad in 3 years, but thinking about sticking for a 4th and making my Biz Minor into a BA (I mean come on! College is fun! I could do it with an intense work load - so it is doable, I came into school with a lot of credits from APs and whatnot).

I'm looking into getting a JD and my adviser wants me to look into JD-MBA programs, which are insane, but would also be insane if I had one!

I know NYU has a great program and I probably need like a 170 on my LSAT to get into that program, not sure what I need to get into the Stern program, (not really sure what the Biz School grad test is... is it just the GRE?)

So anyway, what tests do I need to take to get into one of these daul-programs, and what school offer these? (I know NYU, Yale, Hardvard, Sanford, etc, etc, but what about second level schools? Dose a school like Florida? Any schools from DC area? Some other bigger schools, Baylor? Vanderbilt? Northeastern? and other schools like that. I want to go to a great school, but I'm not really looking at the best of the best like Sanford, not that I don't want to go, I just want to consider the next group of school more... more choices, "easier" to get into).

thanks guys!
-ice
Post edited by icefreeze57 on

Replies to: JD MBA Programs

  • sybbie719sybbie719 Posts: 16,803Super Moderator Senior Member
    The process at NYU

    The GMAT or GRE is not required for JD/MBA applicants who can demonstrate strong quantitative ability and preparedness for the mathematical rigors of the MBA program through their prior coursework, professional experience, and/or certifications. If you are not certain that your background demonstrates the level of quantitative ability required to be successful in the MBA program, you are strongly encouraged to take the GMAT or GRE by the application deadline. If you have taken the GMAT or GRE, you are responsible for ensuring that Pearson VUE or ETS is able to release and send your official score
    report to NYU Stern by the application deadline.

    Stern’s GMAT reporting code is 5TF-HW-35. Stern’s
    GRE reporting code is 4455

    http://www.law.nyu.edu/ecm_dlv4/groups/public/@nyu_law_website__admissions__jd_admissions/documents/documents/ecm_pro_069875.pdf


    Applicants who wish to apply directly to the dual degree J.D./M.B.A. program should follow the procedures outlined below:

    Submit the School of Law application, including one letter of recommendation and a personal statement, by February 15
    Register for the Credential Assembly Service (CAS) and take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
    Complete the required NYU Stern J.D./M.B.A. Supplemental Application Forms including one additional letter of recommendation, by February 15
    Send the completed NYU Stern J.D./M.B.A. Application Supplemental Forms to:

    NYU School of Law
    Office of Admissions
    139 MacDougal Street, Suite C-20
    New York, NY 10012
    ATTN: J.D./M.B.A. Program
    Phone: (if required for mailing) 212-998-6060


    While there is only one J.D./M.B.A. application, each school has a separate Admissions Committee and admissions process. You may be admitted to both programs, only one program, or neither program in this admissions process. Dual degree applicants will be considered for admission based on the same standards as the rest of the applicant pool.

    NYU Law - Dual Degree Programs: J.D./M.B.A.
  • DueceyDuecey Posts: 73Registered User Junior Member
    MBA-JD programs are gigantic money pits. Few hiring managers take these programs seriously.

    You basically tack on an extra year of foregone salary and 120k in law school debt to get the exact same job offers as regular MBA students.

    More so, the JD hurts you. Unless it is from Harvard or equivalent, a JD is toxic on a resume in the business world. Even if combined with an MBA, employers will view the credential skeptically.
  • sallyawpsallyawp Posts: 2,059Registered User Senior Member
    Few hiring managers take these programs seriously.

    I've never experienced that before, but I suppose it could be true if the JD or the MBA is not from a well respected school.
    More so, the JD hurts you. Unless it is from Harvard or equivalent, a JD is toxic on a resume in the business world. Even if combined with an MBA, employers will view the credential skeptically.

    Again, in my experience this has not at all been true. In fact, I have had the opposite experience with significant credit (perhaps more than I am due) being given to my JD/MBA throughout my career by my legal clients, my business associates, potential employers, actual employers, and colleagues. I have found the dual degree to be invaluable in affording me the credibility that I need in order to secure and maintain the business I have brought into my practice. That said, I have chosen to practice law primarily in the areas of M&A, securities, private equity and similar transactional areas, so the two degrees are particularly applicable to my work.
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