Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community polls, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

Should I attend law school?

wfergus18wfergus18 Posts: 29Registered User New Member
edited December 2012 in Law School
I want to major in business and then attend law school. It is a big passion for me, but I don't know what are the prospects for me or if I should just go with something else. My concern is not about actually attending law school, but of what will happen after it, getting into the real world.

What do you think?
Post edited by wfergus18 on
«1345

Replies to: Should I attend law school?

  • crazedcrazed Posts: 1,907Registered User Senior Member
    Hopefully by the time you graduate the economy will be much better!

    Sounds like you are an undergrad or in HS. You have plenty of time. Business is a great undergrad major. Start with that and then decide if you want to work, obtain an MBA, or pursue a law degree.

    After law school, you will find a job (hopefully). You'll learn more and more and apply what you've learned. Where you work will determine what you will be doing. Very variable. Large firm, small firm, real estate law, tax atty, finance, banking.....For now, take one step at a time.
  • lawkidlawkid Posts: 6Registered User New Member
    Why do you really want to go to law school? Why is it your passion?
  • wfergus18wfergus18 Posts: 29Registered User New Member
    I like to stand out for others, defend them and helping them solve their problems, I don't like people who try to take advantage from others and get benefits from it or what the other person was supposed to get.

    Usually when I am in school and I have an argument, I'm always right. The reason of this is that, if I am not sure that I will be right I don't argue to be right, just to try to make a deal, even with teachers.

    I know how to communicate. When I argue with teachers or someone else and i'm right, they never end hating me. While if someone else tries to argue and approaches in a wrong way, they will tag him for life.

    In conclusion, I like to use my communication skills to help others and get them through their problems not mattering how difficult or easy they are, if you are a client and I see you are guilty, I rather not to choose the case, than to be a dirty lawyer.
  • lawkidlawkid Posts: 6Registered User New Member
    Being a lawyer is nothing like you think it'll be like. Being a good arguer means nothing and has pretty much nothing to do with what you'll likely end up doing.

    As a lawyer, your job isn't to judge your clients. Your job is to defend them to the utmost of your ability. Everyone is entitled to a trial, your job is to ensure they get a fair one.
  • SikorskySikorsky Posts: 5,851Registered User Senior Member
    Every year, American law schools graduate more new lawyers than the country has a need for.

    Each year that American law schools do this, the glut of lawyers grows. New law-school graduates compete for jobs not only against each other, but also against all the people still looking for work from the year or two before.

    I wouldn't recommend law school for anybody who can find something else that he or she could be happy doing.
  • zoosermomzoosermom Posts: 23,750Registered User Senior Member
    Excellent writing skills are critically important for a lawyer. You will need to give some attention to yours.
  • LaBarristerLaBarrister Posts: 168Registered User Junior Member
    wfergus18,

    I agree with the previous statements (by zoosermom). I assumed that you plan to work heavily on your writing ability throughout undergrad. But, in case that was not your plan, heed the warning above. You may be a good communicator, and that is great. I commend you for it because many people aren't. But writing is a different type of communication that you need to focus on heavily as well. I'm an engineering major, but I also double-majored in English because of the lack of writing in engineering (in case I end up being a lawyer). You don't have to take it this far. But if you do not major in something that requires a consistent development of your writing abilities, I would suggest getting an English minor.
  • turtlerockturtlerock Posts: 1,119Registered User Senior Member
    I agree with the previous statements (by zoosermom).
    And I'll third.
    writing is a different type of communication that you need to focus on heavily as well . . . if you do not major in something that requires a consistent development of your writing abilities, I would suggest getting an English minor.
    Philosophy is also an option to this. There is a lot of writing in Philosophy, and specifically a lot of writing in logic and reasoning - often to prove a point based off of someone else's logic or reasoning. Some view the texts as a little more dense than traditional literature, but IMO can appeal to some of those who truly find law a passion.
  • zoosermomzoosermom Posts: 23,750Registered User Senior Member
    In many (possibly most) law firms of every size, young lawyers are assessed on their writing skills every year. More senior lawyers will ask of each other "how is her writing" whenever an unfamiliar attorney is assigned to his or her work. It is impossible to advance without excellent writing skills. The same holds true at public service and government law jobs.
  • AxelrodAxelrod Posts: 663Registered User Member
    Business school is a solid choice for the working world, but not great preparation for law school where analytical thinking & writing skills are most important.

    Get a BA in business, work for a few years & then decide between getting an MBA or JD degree.
  • northwestynorthwesty Posts: 427Registered User Member
    1. Being a lawyer is very much about reading and writing and thinking. Not really very much about talking and arguing.

    2. Most business and accounting type majors, if they become lawyers, become corporate/business lawyers rather litigators.

    3. Law school tuition is extremely expensive, plus there's 3 years of opportunity costs. Job prospects for law school graduates currently stink and will likely not improve even if the economy does.

    Unless you can go for free (or close to free) at a top tier law school, no one should go to law school straight from college. As I tell kids like you when asked, "if you are going to wind up in personal bankruptcy, aren't there a lot more fun ways to accomplish that objective than spending 3 years in law school?"
  • muckdogs07muckdogs07 Posts: 1,166Registered User Senior Member
    If you excel academically and can go to a T14, then law school remains a pretty good bet (although not a sure thing). But f you go to a less well known school, prepare to be in the top 10% of the class (or higher) to find decent employment.
  • AxelrodAxelrod Posts: 663Registered User Member
    The Top 14 law schools are probably a 60% overall bet of obtaining a worthwhile position after graduation.

    When applying to law school, the three most important factors are:
    1) LSAT score
    2) GPA
    3) LSAT score & GPA combined.
  • northwestynorthwesty Posts: 427Registered User Member
    I'd agree that a T14 law school these days gives you about a 60% chance of a decent economic employment outcome. Sticker price COA in the T14 is $75k per year.

    The real rub, however, is that many schools outside of the T14 also cost that much, but with significantly worse economic outcomes. Sure you can do OK if you wind up in the top 10% of your class.

    But the only way to find out if you'll be top 10% is after you pay the cash and opportunity costs. So if you wind up in the 90%...?
  • JonLawJonLaw Posts: 184Registered User Junior Member
    I can't think of a good reason to go to law school these days.

    I would not have chosen to go to law school knowing what I know now having been practicing law for 12 years.

    Don't be me.
«1345
Sign In or Register to comment.