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Arts Supplement

asinine16asinine16 Posts: 333Registered User Junior Member
Hello everybody!

I am a Questbridge applicant who has ranked MIT for the National College Match. Looking over my portfolio and matching its context with MIT's vision in science as well as, surprisingly, in art, I have decided to potentially submit my work.

Medium: Photography
Images: 10
Style: Formal Abstraction

To be honest, it is really tough submitting work. How can art be graded? It's whole philosophical base is subjectivity. Sigh.

Let me know what you think :D

*I am submitting an art supplement for MIT only because one of my MIT essays deals with the connections I make with art and science, and how that shapes my thinking.

Portfolio ! - a set on Flickr
Post edited by asinine16 on

Replies to: Arts Supplement

  • LionHeart365LionHeart365 Posts: 103Registered User Junior Member
    Your portfolio is awesome!

    I just wanted to ask that in the Photography supplement, what exactly are we submitting ?
    Pictures taken by us by camera, created digitally, selected on the internet or some fusion with hand sketches etc ??
  • asinine16asinine16 Posts: 333Registered User Junior Member
    Thank you!

    The specifications were vague. To the best of my knowledge, I would think they accept any medium as broad as any type of photography.
    Hope this helped!
  • LionHeart365LionHeart365 Posts: 103Registered User Junior Member
    ^ If any medium is credited with being the real talent, then may be some hours of good internet searching might just make me a professional arts supplement.

    I wonder how are these supplements evaluated.

    Could some MIT Genius explain what exactly are they looking for when dealing with "Photography" ?
  • asinine16asinine16 Posts: 333Registered User Junior Member
    That's really sad that some people would do that.

    I did talk to someone over the phone from MIT about how this portion of the application would be reviewed. But before they said anything, I immediately contemplated how art is subjective and can never be given a grade for. The MIT person agreed and said that this supplement only makes your application better, and would not be the deciding factor whether you get in or not. Due to this, I am probably going to send a short essay (with the attachment) connecting my photos to my philosophies and ideals in art and science :).
  • LionHeart365LionHeart365 Posts: 103Registered User Junior Member
    Could some1 from MIT tell how does MIT evaluate if the photographs sent as supplement - are not taken by that person but rather taken from the internet / other sources ?
  • molliebatmitmolliebatmit Posts: 12,154Super Moderator Senior Member
    I'm not sure I understand the question. To submit an arts supplement to MIT, the art pieces in question must be your own original work: graphic art must be drawn by you, sculptures or pottery must be made by you, photographs must be taken by you. You must be able to represent the art, not just the curation, as your own creation.
  • LionHeart365LionHeart365 Posts: 103Registered User Junior Member
    photographs must be taken by you
    Yes the photographs are taken by me, but from the internet :D

    So the OP have taken all the pictures with his camera or has he digitally altered some ?

    If so, then is it legal :p to alter the pics taken by the applicant in Photoshop ?
  • CalAlumCalAlum Posts: 1,356Registered User Senior Member
    To be honest, it is really tough submitting work. How can art be graded? It's whole philosophical base is subjectivity. Sigh.

    @ asinine16 -- Your art portfolio will be evaluated by an individual in MIT's architecture department, which houses "visual arts." It is definitely possible to evaluate a piece of art, just as it is possible to evaluate an essay, piece of music, speech, dance, or any other kind of "performance." In fact, there is an AP "test" in Studio Art, in which the student submits a portfolio to be evaluated and scored. Just as with any other AP test, the student receives a score from 1-5.

    @Lionheart365 -- anyone could lie on a college application. A student could claim any number of achievements. The best way to show that one has truly achieved is to back up the claim with statements from school counselors, letters, of recommendation, supporting essays, and so on. Also -- given the image-recognition systems now available online, it would be pretty easy to spot plagiarism in an online work of art.
  • LionHeart365LionHeart365 Posts: 103Registered User Junior Member
    ^ But does a digitally altered photograph count as a part of the portfolio ?
  • CalAlumCalAlum Posts: 1,356Registered User Senior Member
    ^ It all depends. The artists at MIT can evaluate the quality of the work. For a great example of a radically altered digital image, see the image John Maeda, of MIT's Media Lab, created for the cover of Key Magazine. The New York Times magazine has a slideshow online in which Maeda explains how he made the image: http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2007/09/06/realestate/keymagazine/20070909_KEY_COV_SS_index.html.
    Enjoy.
  • molliebatmitmolliebatmit Posts: 12,154Super Moderator Senior Member
    Yes the photographs are taken by me, but from the internet
    This is intentionally obtuse. I said:
    me wrote:
    You must be able to represent the art, not just the curation, as your own creation.
    For a photography supplement, the applicant must take the pictures with his or her own camera. Whether the pictures are subsequently altered using photo editing software is up to the discretion of the artist.

    If you would like to submit a supplement with the photos of others (presumably shared with a creative commons license or the like), you are welcome to do so as long as you attribute the original photographs to their creators and specify that your contribution was to collect and digitally alter them. Submitting a supplement without acknowledging the work of others would be plagiarism and would be highly unethical.
  • asinine16asinine16 Posts: 333Registered User Junior Member
    As an artist, I hate the collegeboard standards on what is art and what is not. It's complete bull. The most talented artists will get a 3 on the collegeboard art exams, but the formal artist who has followed all the constricting rules of photography would get a 5. There's no voice in that work.

    Maybe I'm just conceptual.
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