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what are the scholarship provided by mit

tarasjtarasj Posts: 2Registered User New Member
Am a undergraduate student from Nepal Interested in doing graduation from MIT what
is the procedure for me to admit into MIT and what is the scholarship i will get since i cant afford for the fees and accomodation.
Post edited by tarasj on

Replies to: what are the scholarship provided by mit

  • lidushalidusha Posts: 1,268Registered User Senior Member
    Info on applying is here: How To Apply To MIT | MIT Admissions

    MIT gives need-based financial aid, which means that you'll have to pay as much of your tuition as you can, but no more than that.

    Good luck. :)
  • MikalyeMikalye Posts: 1,132Registered User Senior Member
    Indeed, and it is not just tuition. I know of a young man from Nepal admitted a few years back. When MIT calculated his annual family income for the year before, the total family income was five US Dollars per year. Forget free tuition, this is a kid who if he landed at the airport could not afford the subway/metro to the campus. He needed e erything. And so MIT gave him Everything.

    There are only six institutions in the US that guarantee to both use need-blind admissions and also guarantee fo meeti full financial need over four years. MIT, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, and Amherst, and that's it [Caveat, this is for the newly admitted class, we haven't had conformation of admissions policy for the admissions cycle still to come.
  • coolapple1coolapple1 Posts: 347Registered User Member
    ^UPenn is need-blind too
  • MikalyeMikalye Posts: 1,132Registered User Senior Member
    No, Penn is not.

    While Penn like many schools is need blind/full need for Americans, Penn's website states clearly "The University provides over $8 million each year in financial aid to students who are not citizens or permanent residents of the United States, Canada, or Mexico. However, because the offer of admission for non-citizens is directly linked to their ability to meet expenses, candidates whose families have the financial means to afford educational costs are encouraged not to apply for financial aid."

    Penn making offers of admission "directly linked to [candidates] ability to meet expenses" means that Penn is need-aware, exactly the opposite of need blind at least for poor kids from Nepal.

    I repeat that there are only six schools that are both need-blind for admissions and guarantee to meet full need for internationals. MIT is one of them.
  • mitmydreammitmydream Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    i m a undergraduate student from Nepal.i want to study bachelor in engineering from MIT.i want to know about admission procedure and scholarship scheme.since my economic condition is very weak,i cant afford for even tution fees and accomodation.is it possible for me to get admitted there or not? or only wealthy person can apply for it? plz reply.
  • melody10511melody10511 Posts: 274- Junior Member
    Everyone can apply to MIT and possibly get full-ride if his/her situation's bad. However, MIT requires English proficiency for all internationals so I don't think your English levels are quite sufficient for admission. (unless I'm mistaken or you're just ****)
  • MikalyeMikalye Posts: 1,132Registered User Senior Member
    MIT will meet the full financial need for all admitted students. I was involved in the admissions of a student a few years back from a small mountain village. When the MIT Student Financial Services office calculated the families income for the year immediately preceding admissions, it worked out a total family income of FIVE US dollars per year. Forget tuition assistance, this is a student who if they land at Boston Logan airport, could not afford the T to MIT.

    In order for him to attend MIT, then MIT had to offer him EVERYTHING. Tuition, room, board, books, supplies, pencils, the lot. He could not afford anything. So MIT gave him everything and he is on campus today.

    Full-need is not just some marketing gumpf. MIT lives it.
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