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college with a good music technology major?

itsjungggggitsjunggggg Posts: 32Registered User Junior Member
edited July 2011 in Music Major
i've been searching up colleges with a good music technology major and my friend recommended USC, Northwestern, University of Miami, and U of Chicago. wondering what your opinions are on those schools?

also, if you have any other colleges that might be a good choice for studying studio engineering, sound designing, mixing engineer, etc. i've also written my own songs so i guess that's music composition? so, if you know any schools that emphasize these types of music types, please share!
thanks :DDD
Post edited by itsjunggggg on
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Replies to: college with a good music technology major?

  • RoKr93RoKr93 Posts: 259Registered User Junior Member
    UMich Performing Arts Technology (BM, BFA, or BS depending on the track you choose), NYU Music Technology (BM), Indiana University Recording Arts (BS) all are options I'm considering, and I'm in the same boat as you. :D

    Although I don't think UChicago has a program in recording...perhaps you're thinking of Columbia College Chicago?
  • kmcmom13kmcmom13 Posts: 3,293Registered User Senior Member
    I can confirm that UChicago does not have any degree whatsoever in music tech, at least not a bmus, or a bfa or a bsc. I know this first hand because my son actually LOVED Uchicago and seriously considered going there for a general BA but there were absolutely no offerings in his chosen field. Great grad composition though.

    I do agree with USC, NU and Miami Frost, plus RoKr's list.
    My question is what are your stats like -- ALL of these programs are quite competitive. What kind of background do you have in terms of instrument performance (eg. private lessons; how many years; regional awards; experience multi-tracking, etc.?)

    There are many many ways to approach music technology but the programs are really quite different. Another not mentioned is Oberlin's TIMARA program. I believe others have mentioned Hart and Peabody in the past, which are also exceptionally strong music schools.

    Are you prepared to audition for a program, or were you thinking you'd be more comfortable (and a stronger applicant) by portfolio? Some programs require both, others just portfolio.

    If you give us a little more information about what you want to DO with a degree, we might be able to help you develop a list of prospective programs.

    PS - You should note (I think) that NU's program is a different flavor as I understand it -- eg. you do study sequencing, programming and other approaches in computer music and midi but when my son looked at the program a few years ago there did not appear to be actual recording or engineering courses. So a little more "electro-acousticy" in nature...
  • itsjungggggitsjunggggg Posts: 32Registered User Junior Member
    i want to pursue music but the thing is, i also want to do psychology at the same time... so i don't want to go to a school that ONLY has music.

    so, i've heard of hart and peabody and oberlin (i actually really like this school) but i heard their emphasis is more on orchestral music and not recording/studio music?

    i don't really know much about programs so i was wondering: once i get into a school, i have to audition (or send in a portfolio) to get into the program??
    for the portfolio, what is it that i need to include in it?

    and my stats... these are all the things i've done and am still doing:
    -i've been in my middle school band (clarinet)
    -in 8th grade, i was part of CSUN's symphony youth orchestra (only for a year)
    -i've been in my church orchestra since 7th grade (we just play every sunday morning)
    -i'm in my youth praise band (electric guitar)
    -had piano lessons for about 5 years and took the CM tests and done a few recitals
    -i've made some songs, but i guess this doesn't really matter cause i haven't done anything with it. hahah.
    i don't have any awards or anything like that :///
    that's pretty much it.

    there's actually a lot of things i want to do. i would love to write songs, make songs, work in a recording studio, record myself and perform (i think this highly unlikely though...hahah), and "process" the music after it's been recorded.
    i hope that's enough info. thanks again!
  • kmcmom13kmcmom13 Posts: 3,293Registered User Senior Member
    Actually, for many of the programs discussed above you have to audition and or submit portfolios BEFORE getting accepted to the programs/schools, and many of the programs are looking for very high stats as indicators of strong math/physics/programming skills required for the level of study. Other programs such as ones called "music technology" will be first focused on you audition.
    I'm not sure about the other schools, but at umich you can't double major because it's highly specialized with many many course requirements. You can however, seek a dual degree, in which case you'd apply at the regular lsa program plus at the school of music. Are you more serious/dedicated to psychology as a vocation? If so, you might simply want to pick up recording-related courses casually or as a minor if available and pursue your music on the side. However, if producing music is your vocation, then you would need/want to start focusing on compiling a very strong portfolio/recommendations, etc. At umich, much of the music created by the pat students is contemporary in nature, but many of the students are accomplished in classical as well. For what you describe wanting, USC, Belmont and mich and nyu sound like good fits. But be warned that it's much more difficult to get into those programs than it is to get into an equally rigorous psych program. Another viable avenue to take in recording is to pursue it at the grad level, eg stanford's masters in music, technology and science, where it's geared more to engineering or science undergrads who also have an interest in music. But since you'd be pursuing psych, you'd not have the engineering background.
    I wonder if u mass lowell might have an avenue wherein you could pursue both? That might be worth looking at.
    I guess it's more about what you want the most. My son is very good at "other" things like writing and design, but he truly could not see himself doing anything else, so he was willing to spend almost all his free time two years in advance developing his recording and electronic composition skills and preparing a robust portfolio while still also performing classical and jazz on his instrument and maintaining a very high gpa. And while he was fortunate to receive a generous scholarship, it also meant he tuned down options that were essentially "free" for him in the final offer.
  • kmcmom13kmcmom13 Posts: 3,293Registered User Senior Member
    Ps -- not trying to scare you off, but I am trying to give you a sense of how competitive some of the programs mentioned are, so that you can assess the level of interest. You may well be every bit as motivated and using psych to hedge your bets, which is not a bad plan ;)

    Also, think in my rush on the iPad, I neglected to include indianna/Jacobs in the "we know it's contemporary in flavor" category -- about half the recording arts student came from a classical background but the other half exclusively contemporary/popular. I'd keep that one very high on your list because the have grat academic scholarships for students with high stats and perhaps a little more double major flexibility because the program is actually a bachelor of science. When my son was considering going there, it would have been relatively uncomplicated to take the telcom (multimedia degree) in tandem. It's certainly not been uncomplicated at umich, because there seem to be more music requirements -- but that's the way he wanted it ;)

    One last caveat -- I'm only talking about programs we are most familiar with. Any omissions about other programs are not at all a reflection of whether they'd be good fits for you ;)
  • itsjungggggitsjunggggg Posts: 32Registered User Junior Member
    woww, sounds very competitve o.O kind of intimidating but it's all goood. XD
    thank you so much for helping me out because trying to find the right schools that fit me is so hard to do!
    i'm still confused with the portfolios and auditions. i thought the process was: i get accepted to a school, then i just take classes concerning music technology as well as the other general classes...? i thought only music schools such as julliard and berklee required auditions to actually get into the school?
  • kmcmom13kmcmom13 Posts: 3,293Registered User Senior Member
    Hi there. Not if you're pursuing a degree in music technology at the schools both rocker and I were discussing. Those schools all have a "school of music" which is just like a conservatory per se but is part of the university setting. To get a sense of the admission process, go. Visit the specific program websites. Best wishes!
  • 18karat18karat Posts: 224Registered User Junior Member
    Often overlooked, Capital University has a stellar music technology program. I think most of the conservatory students are involved in it. They have multiple studios and are expanding right now as well
  • jazz/shreddermomjazz/shreddermom Posts: 1,187Registered User Senior Member
    What year of high school is the OP in?
  • SnowflakeVTSnowflakeVT Posts: 2,168Registered User Senior Member
    8th grade. Plenty of time to figure things out before college auditions. :)
  • kmcmom13kmcmom13 Posts: 3,293Registered User Senior Member
    ^actually, rising senior, according to another post, which is why I've tried to map all this out quickly. It's getting to be portfolio prep time ;)
  • SnowflakeVTSnowflakeVT Posts: 2,168Registered User Senior Member
    Then this poster is confusing because post 5 of this thread only talks about middle school accomplishments. If that's the case, I would say he/she is a planner ... 5 years to figure this stuff out, but if he/she is really a rising senior, then they need to drop references to middle school activities as that is meaningless to a college application process.

    and my stats... these are all the things i've done and am still doing:
    -i've been in my middle school band (clarinet)
    -in 8th grade, i was part of CSUN's symphony youth orchestra (only for a year)
    -i've been in my church orchestra since 7th grade (we just play every sunday morning)
    -i'm in my youth praise band (electric guitar)
    -had piano lessons for about 5 years and took the CM tests and done a few recitals
    -i've made some songs, but i guess this doesn't really matter cause i haven't done anything with it. hahah.
    i don't have any awards or anything like that :///
    that's pretty much it.
  • kmcmom13kmcmom13 Posts: 3,293Registered User Senior Member
    ^from another thread:
    at/act and sat subject tests
    i am going to be a senior this coming fall.
    i'm already freaking out about college apps -.-
    i was just wondering if i have to send ALL of my sat/act and sat subject test scores to the schools that i apply to... or can i just send my best ones?

    The only reason I believe he brought up middle school was to reference one year in CSUNs symphony youth orchestra in response to my asking him to tell us more about his background to get a sense. Note that he says he's been in the church orchestra "SINCE" 7th grade.

    PS, Presumably, CSUN is NOT a middle school orchestra, but is actually the California State University, Northridge youth symphony -- a different level of play ;)
  • SnowflakeVTSnowflakeVT Posts: 2,168Registered User Senior Member
    My bad ... thanks for keep the facts straight, kmcmom.
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