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Online Class can be an easy "A" for cheaters

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Replies to: Online Class can be an easy "A" for cheaters

  • MissShonaMissShona Registered User Posts: 27 New Member
    I earned my MBA online. Due to the ways that most of the classes were structured, there really wasn't a lot of opportunity to cheat. Most of my courses factored in participation and project grades (a bigger issue with projects is that you always have that one member who is like dead weight...but that a whole different issue). In my quantitative courses (finance, accounting, statistics), you could do Google for guidance...but you would still know which formula to look up. The tests were timed, so there was no way you could figure out some concept that you didn't previously practice and/or understand. Some of my courses that were writing intensive utilized that "Turn It In" application, which scans your paper and compares it with online and previous sources to find plagerism.

    Personally, I never quite understood the point of cheating anyway. You work super hard to find a cheat....why not just try to really learn the material? Face to face classes are not immune to cheating. Most online courses are designed where exams are meant to be open-book. I'm sure almost anyone who went through college had an open-book exam and most likely did not get 100% just because it was open book.

    Food for thought!
  • marcdvlmarcdvl Registered User Posts: 1,315 Senior Member
    This is why coursera will never give real college credit, despite being an amazing opportunity to take free classes from some of the best schools in the world.
  • AJ1990AJ1990 Registered User Posts: 85 Junior Member
    I attend a community college in South Carolina that offers a few online Associate degrees. I have been required to go to a campus(be it a satellite or main campus) to take midterms, tests, and finals. I would not attend a college that did not require proctored testing. I want to know that I am learning the material.
  • RainingAgainRainingAgain Registered User Posts: 699 Member
    I've developed and taught online courses. I also have an instructional design background.

    Course developers understand that online testing = open book test and collaboration. This is not necessarily a bad thing unless tests are the only types of assessments in the course. Open book tests can be useful to at least encourage students to engage content, and use resources in a meaningful way.

    Course developers are encouraged to reduce the grade weights of online tests, and to use other types of assignments in order to assess student performance. For example, students can give presentations and participate in discussions in order to demonstrate the ability to synthesize information and respond with original answers.

    Some institutions provide better support and training for online faculty and course developers. Some online courses and many institutions truly suck and fail, but many are wonderful and successful.
  • Basic10Basic10 Registered User Posts: 27 New Member
    It's very easy to cheat online. I've taken a few online classes and it really easy and also quite sad.
  • ddahwanddahwan Registered User Posts: 591 Member
    It depends on the University. Mine had so many assignments and timed quizzes every week that even with the book you would not be able to answer all the questions if you had not read material or did the research.
  • emberjedemberjed Registered User Posts: 1,367 Senior Member
    At some level, it's your own fault if you pass an online class by cheating and do poorly in another class that requires it.
  • WonderWoman23WonderWoman23 Registered User Posts: 18 New Member
    Penn State World Campus has been quite rigorous. The professors really make you work for your grades but I appreciate it because it forces me to learn the material.
  • RaleighGirlRaleighGirl Registered User Posts: 42 Junior Member
    I take online classes for mostly convenience, 3 people with 1 car. Not to mention no driver's license. I would say it depends on the degree and the type of person your instructor is. My test didn't even give me any time to cheat, I just winged them, some were just too easy, there was no need to cheat. On one class though I could understand why she would do it to quizzes however I was mind blown to find one of my online classes let me take the midterms and finals again, and showing the answers after the first completion.
  • preamble1776preamble1776 Registered User Posts: 4,731 Senior Member
    I was able to take my Math placement test at home prior to my Freshman orientation a few weeks back - the testing window was 24 hours (for a 50 question test) with no anti-cheating measures in place other than the assumption that people wouldn't cheat on a placement test and subsequently flounder in an upper level math class they couldn't handle. However, the test also entailed a waiver for a particular general ed if one scored high enough - which I did. I later found out that I couldn't waive the requirement unless I took the test on campus with a proctor. A pain in the ass to be honest, but I buckled down and retook it and ended up with the same score. I'm thankful I didn't cheat (using a calculator counted as cheating in this case, along with the other typical tactics like googling answers or having someone else take the test) because it would look pretty suspicious if I placed into Calculus II the first time around only to get placed into Algebra II the second time, LOL.
  • someguyinNCsomeguyinNC Registered User Posts: 37 Junior Member
    edited January 2015
    Any University that gives degrees online/distance education and doesn't require tests to be proctored is not worth considering. I would wager 90% of these are for profit and none of these classes transfer anywhere. All the programs worth a damn are upfront about it and provide a huge list of proctors available all throughout the USA. Many are free. Some cost just 5 bucks. Setting it up is easy. If your allowed to take tests/exams at home... RUN... or just give me your money. I'm sure I can come up with a better way to spend it :)
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