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Math vs. Philosophy.......

baller4lyfeballer4lyfe Posts: 1,214Registered User Senior Member
edited July 2012 in Other College Majors
if you are DONE with your math, (this does not have to include finishing all the way up to calculus...just finishing whatever is transferbale...) can philosophy courses take its place?

meaning do you use the same technique of thinking when doing philosophy as you would use when doing math.

much thanks..
Post edited by baller4lyfe on
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Replies to: Math vs. Philosophy.......

  • kitkattailkitkattail Posts: 576Registered User Member
    It depends on the branch of philosophy, I think, and the particular philosopher in question. I do think, however, that someone who enjoys math will like many things within philosophy.
  • Z e r o XZ e r o X Posts: 195Registered User Junior Member
    I disagree. I would think that a math major would dislike philosopy and vice versa.

    This is because math is both very logical and very REAL and can Be Proved. Math can be applied to all areas of life and is the backbone of society. After a major in math, you'll be very logical and can work in any field. Math unlocks the secrets of the universe.

    Philosopy on the other hands is more like liberal arts or history. You 'invent' theories without any proof whatsoever. Anything you say can be true as long as you say something that is. Its alot like a major in religion. in that it has no applications to REAL-world, and after graduation, you'll have Nothing useful to show for it. the only door philosopy unlocks is the janitors or mcdonalds doors after 4 easy do-nothing years of college and 45 years of working the 3-11 shift at dominos lol, you'll wished you had majored in something real and USEFUL lol.

    A major in philosophy Yammers ON & ON about "Going Beyond Form" when every Student knows that that’s WHY you study, to get BEYOND the Form, and get skills into your BONES.

    Anything that philosopy majors didn’t Comprehend, thhe condemned. It would have been FAR easier to just ASK someone that knew better, but that would have been Beyond what their Ego would allow.

    That’s SO Unfair .
  • Z e r o XZ e r o X Posts: 195Registered User Junior Member
    just my 2 cents.
  • ikke_tmrikke_tmr Posts: 19Registered User New Member
    please! you're absolutely wrong! you're saying you can't combine both? i'm planning to major in Mathematics-Philosophy at Yale! .... also most great philosophers were in fact mathematicians as well (eg. Leibniz, Descartes, Aristotle,...) some of the biggest scientific discoveries have been made by.....PHILOSOPHERS! Also you don't just make up theories! They have to be supported by logical deductions and make some sense! And another thing, you obviuosly don't know a lot about philosophy and religion, they overlap but they're defintely not the same at all
  • ikke_tmrikke_tmr Posts: 19Registered User New Member
    and for baller4lyfe's question; if you study philosophy and mathematics you'll pretty much do logic and stuff like that; in that way math and phil are very much the same
  • Veritas949Veritas949 Posts: 197Registered User Junior Member
    Zero, you are a foolish person. Not only for this response, but for almost every response you ever made on various CC forums. You only make preconceived notions based on what you think, not what you know. You have no idea about metaphysics, logic, careers, or anything in life. All you care about is money and have no passion for what you wish to pursue. Because of this you will probably not succeed in whatever you strive to become. You're probably going to end up working at some desk job pushing papers because you plan to go to Northeastern or whatever mediocre school while a Harvard Philosophy grad will take a 100k a year entry-level job at an i-bank you wish you could work for.
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 4,336Registered User Senior Member
    Yeah zero... two cents would be too high a price to pay for that drivel. Don't go saying things about something you obviously have know nothing about. Take a few philosophy classes (maybe a few in modal logic, ethical theory, and metaphysics), and then you can tell me how "useless" it is, and how things are just invented without any basis. Until then, keep your mouth shut.
  • Z e r o XZ e r o X Posts: 195Registered User Junior Member
    Math could be Applied to real life.

    Anything anybody says can be philosopy, its their philosophy, right? I don't think philosophy degree can be applied in real-world like math. Its really an extinct major.

    People like Leibniz, Descartes, Aristotle are philosophers because Everybody back then was one. They hadn't invented physics yet, so people turned to philosophy and religion for the answers.

    But today scientist Know better physics and math. I don't see any modern scientist that is a philosophy major? Don't see anybody of importance in philosophy as a matter of a fact.

    Just my 3 cents.
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 4,336Registered User Senior Member
    hahaha ok man, whatever you say
    Philosophy is not the subjective, bs all you want field you apparently think it is. I already mentioned that logic is a field of philosophy - nothing could be further from subjective, or further from useless for that matter.

    I don't know what you mean by anyone of importance - you obviously have a different definition of important than I do, so I'm not even going to respond to that one.

    But anyway, usefulness very much depends on the person in many respects. When I'm a doctor, I think my strong background in ethics and philosophy will be invaluable. Then again, knowing advanced mathematics or physics would do jack for me. I'm sorry you feel the way you do about philosophy, history, and other such liberal arts - all of which are very important fields of thought. I think you know less about "real life" and what is useful and important than you think you do.



    But in response to the OP, it depends on what philosophy class you take. I don't think that any philosophy class you could find would require the same kind of thinking, but certainly if you took a philosophy of mathematics or a logic course, the thought process would be identical.
  • Z e r o XZ e r o X Posts: 195Registered User Junior Member
    Can you give me an example of where it could be applied in Real Life?

    Math can be applied in making computers, chairs, everything.

    What about philosophy? What could you make with that? beside saying that it helped you ethically... since ethics is different for everybody.

    And for the record, I didn't say all liberal arts are useless. History, sociology, english has its place. Its just that outdated majors like philosophy, religion, etc. isn't going to get you a job unless you go to grad school. Might as well major in basketweaving if your aiming for a 4.0 GPA.

    I know alot of company hiring engineers, pharmacist, lawyers, programmers, mathematicians, etc. But what company hires philosophers?

    just my 4 cents.
  • Z e r o XZ e r o X Posts: 195Registered User Junior Member
    "Zero, you are a foolish person. Not only for this response, but for almost every response you ever made on various CC forums. You only make preconceived notions based on what you think, not what you know. You have no idea about metaphysics, logic, careers, or anything in life. All you care about is money and have no passion for what you wish to pursue. Because of this you will probably not succeed in whatever you strive to become. You're probably going to end up working at some desk job pushing papers because you plan to go to Northeastern or whatever mediocre school while a Harvard Philosophy grad will take a 100k a year entry-level job at an i-bank you wish you could work for"

    Wentworth Institute of Technology is the best I can do right now. But you can place your money the fact that engineering at WIT is going to be twice as hard as philosophy at Harvard. And they're almost garanteed a job in engineering. Can you say the same for philosophy (without grad school)? Will a philosophy major at havard be garanteed a i-banking job? I didn't think so..
  • Penn15Penn15 Posts: 259Registered User Junior Member
    Sorry to break it to you, but a philosophy major at Harvard will have an infinitely better chance of getting a ibanking job than a eng major from Wentworth.

    You have absolutely no idea what Ibanking is, or what it entails, or how the recruiting process works. Please don't speak as though you are an expert in the field. I sure am not one, though I have done my due diligence before coming onto this board by reading articles, talking with others who have had IB experience, and doing my own research. Please don't waste our time with your responses that lack substance.
  • IcarusIcarus Posts: 4,336Registered User Senior Member
    since ethics is different for everybody.

    ah, see thats where you're wrong... I won't get into ethical theory with you, but needless to say, your assessment is incorrect.

    And second, are you so blinded by the narrow position that the only purpose of education is preparation for the workforce that you cannot see the importance of deep thought and becoming a whole individual? Personally, I plan on being a perpetual student - always learning about many things, and I will be a better person for it. Third, you're still wrong (hahah seeing a trend here?) - a bachelors degree in math, psychology, or any of your so-called "useful" majors won't get you very far without an accompanying graduate degree. You say you know a lot of companies hiring lawyers (a doctorate degree position, fyi), pharmacists (also a separate school), engineers, etc. You might want to look further into those - I would be willing to bet they're looking for people with a Ph.D. in engineering or mathematics.

    You asked about people of importance in philosophy... there are too many to count, but I think a great example of a world-class philosopher is the man that lays dying in the Vatican right now. And this = People like Leibniz, Descartes, Aristotle are philosophers because Everybody back then was one. = you're kidding right?

    Come on, ZeroX, stop spreading this nonsense - I worry that someone might actually start to agree with you haha
  • videogamerx2videogamerx2 Posts: 434Registered User Member
    mathematics is a type of philosophy
  • kitkattailkitkattail Posts: 576Registered User Member
    Zero, you seem to be using the term "philosophy" in its everyday sense, that is, you seem to think it only means an outlook on life. But in fact, the philosophical writings of the great thinkers are much more rigorous than that—and that's why I originally said that a math major would like quite a bit of philosophy, because both subjects have in common a rigorous need for proof and a desire to build a system of knowledge whose basis cannot be disputed. Both involve logical thinking and a certain pedantic attention to detail. I often think of philosophy as math that uses words instead of symbols.

    The study of philosophy, then, is certainly not useless. Besides being very interesting and a whole lot of fun, it teaches us to think clearly and analytically, and to separate the false from the true—and those are skills you need no matter what you end up doing. If you take a couple of courses in it, I'm sure you'll find that it becomes the backbone of your intellect, an invaluable reference point in your thinking.
    People like Leibniz, Descartes, Aristotle are philosophers because Everybody back then was one. They hadn't invented physics yet, so people turned to philosophy and religion for the answers.

    It's true that back in the Greek era everyone who studied scientific things was called a philosopher, but that's simply because the term had a much wider meaning back in the day. Etymologically, "philosophy" merely means "love of knowledge," so back in Aristotle's day, what we today call science was just lumped in together with what we now call philosophy. You might have heard the term "natural philosophy" applied to science, for example; it was at that point merely considered a type of philosophy. As for the statement that they "hadn't invented physics yet," you might note that the word "physics" is itself derived from Greek. Who do you think came up with the term in the first place? You might remember that one of the main achievements of the Renaissance was its debunking of some of Aristotle's incorrect assumptions in physics. Obviously they had physics "back then," although like many a physicist, Aristotle came up with some theories that were later proven wrong. (But hey, you've got to start somewhere, right?)

    Zero, with your strong interesting in math, I think you would actually like philosophy very much. As I said, you seem to harbour a misconception about what philosophy actually is and the sorts of things it studies, because just as many precise terms in math and science are bastardized when they are used by laymen, so "philosophy" has taken on an everyday sense of "a set of personal values." But it is in fact much more than that, and it saddens me that you haven't been able to experience it at its best but only in the withered, watered-down form that you see in the popular media around you. I guarantee you that if you read some of the greats—Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hume, Kant, etc.—you'll find that it opens up a whole new world for you, and you'll be extremely excited. Just trust me on this one: take a course. You'll never regret it.
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