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Any Guesses on the New Amazon HQ?

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Replies to: Any Guesses on the New Amazon HQ?

  • LakeWashingtonLakeWashington Registered User Posts: 9,127 Senior Member
    What I mean by income inequality, as applied to specific urban areas, is the relatively high proportion of poverty. The issue of social/income distress in Seattle is complicated because many limited income persons, not necessarily the poor, have migrated there lately and have taken up residence in city parks and under freeway exit ramps, with the full consent of city leaders. Many of these folks express no desire to avail themselves of traditional social services. Today in Seattle there are jalopy RVs and pup tents in many neighborhoods, including solidly middle class neighborhoods.

    Contrast this with Philadelphia and Atlanta; two cities with substantial populations of struggling poor residents. As I said earlier, one of Philadelphia's advantages is available land and affordable housing. That's true of Atlanta also. Where Atlanta falls is the mediocre public transit system and significant traffic gridlock. Take a look at Amazon's requirements for HQ2.
  • emilybeeemilybee Registered User Posts: 11,606 Senior Member
  • wis75wis75 Registered User Posts: 12,241 Senior Member
    edited October 13
    Distribution centers are totally independent of headquarters locations. I can see Denver as a place that would draw the demographic wanting to work at a main Amazon location. Or Bezos may be looking for a place that workers can age in place in- ie be middle aged.
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 13,957 Senior Member
    I think Toronto would be a better Canadian bet than Montreal.

    Isn' traffic/transportation in Atlanta dismal these days?
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,101 Senior Member
    Been bad in Atlanta for a long time. So the work-home line needs to have options. That's why I find west of Boston intriguing. I had a tech client out there and employees could live within 15 minutes.
  • LakeWashingtonLakeWashington Registered User Posts: 9,127 Senior Member
    The Boston suburbs are pricey, particularly the western suburbs. A friend worked for a high tech firm in the Lexington area. It was a blessing that he lived just a few minutes from work but the cost of his home was not insubstantial.
  • NEPatsGirlNEPatsGirl Registered User Posts: 2,135 Senior Member
    Well, certainly Lexington is expensive but there are many towns that are more affordable in the area, especially if you are willing to commute 30 minutes or so.
  • 3scoutsmom3scoutsmom Registered User Posts: 4,378 Senior Member
    We moved from outside Boston to outside of Austin and the taxes and cost of living are MUCH less in Texas.
  • lookingforwardlookingforward Registered User Posts: 24,101 Senior Member
    edited October 13
    Lex is among the most expensive suburbs and off 95, 10 miles from Boston, as the crow flies. Along with Concord and a few others, great cachet. It's not part of the Metro West we're talking about. We mean the broad range of bedroom communities further out, following Rt 495. And in that area, many tech companies. Not stuck with a 30 min commute, nothing like traffic around the city. Good quality of life, good k12, and more.
  • partyof5partyof5 Registered User Posts: 1,813 Senior Member
    I would say Columbus or Cincinnati Ohio would be good options. You get a Big Bang for buck, and a choice of good public school districts with reasonable housing.

    Th problem is once Amazon moves to an area, the housing will no longer be reasonable. The article above mentioned cities with good public transportation which would remove most of the cities vying for the business.
  • MagnetronMagnetron Registered User Posts: 2,142 Senior Member
    A big issue missing from many of these cities is the ability to poach talent. Part of what made Amazon successful here is there were already hundreds of thousands of trained computer professionals thanks to Microsoft and Google and other smaller companies. Places like Orlando or Cincinnati just won't have the density.

    I still think Texas, either Dallas or Austin. After that would be Raleigh and Atlanta. They seem to be concentrating on the anti-Seattle, so sunny, hot, and Republican, but a desirable enough city to attract young people.
  • SouthernHopeSouthernHope Registered User Posts: 1,714 Senior Member
    Oh, i have an interesting update, you guys! As we know, the RFP was public and any city could access (we can too! :) https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/Anything/test/images/usa/RFP_3._V516043504_.pdf ) but i heard from a friend in Pittsburgh that maybe 15 to 20 cities (he wasn't sure of the number) have been given a higher level of nondisclosure documents as of a couple of weeks ago. And those cities are operating with more information than others as far as how to structure the bid. In any case, everything is due October 19....it will be interesting indeed to see.
  • doschicosdoschicos Registered User Posts: 13,957 Senior Member
    Do you really think Bezos considers Republican leaning as a draw?
  • DefensorDefensor Registered User Posts: 220 Junior Member
    "I still think Texas, either Dallas or Austin. After that would be Raleigh and Atlanta. They seem to be concentrating on the anti-Seattle, so sunny, hot, and Republican, but a desirable enough city to attract young people." ~ Magnetron

    All of the cities you mentioned have democrat mayors.
  • LakeWashingtonLakeWashington Registered User Posts: 9,127 Senior Member
    @Magnetron There are several interesting articles and opinion pieces about the possible impact of hosting the new AZ HQ2. One urban affairs scholar said that Amazon has a unique opportunity to prove that you can move life-changing jobs to people who need them, rather than the old principle of motivating laborers to move to where the jobs are...because in this day and age in America, the folks who need the jobs perhaps the most, cannot afford to move to new locations. That's one argument. Don't know if I agree.

    When Boeing opened its new facility in South Carolina, Boeing PNW workers raised cain and bitterly opined that few skilled workers in the PNW would re-locate to South Carolina. It would be interesting to find out where Boeing SC workers have come from in the main.
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