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Can Foam Eggcrate mattress pads be washed/cleaned?

2boysima2boysima Posts: 1,792Registered User Senior Member
edited October 2006 in Parent Cafe
Issue is odor more than dirt.

If you have any experience washing or cleaning these, your input would be appreciated!
Post edited by 2boysima on

Replies to: Can Foam Eggcrate mattress pads be washed/cleaned?

  • citygirlsmomcitygirlsmom Posts: 13,158- Senior Member
    fabreeze and maybe hosing it down

    they are so cheap, how old is the one you have?
  • sunnyfloridasunnyflorida Posts: 4,790Registered User Senior Member
    Well, in my part of the country it is warm much of the year, and I have hosed it down, used oxyclean mixed with water in a spray bottle (seems good with stains and odors) and then left it out in full sun to dry. The southern full sun also helps to naturally "bleach" things and seems to help with odor. Another option is to take it to the cleaners and so what they can do and for what price. If its an inexpensive one, might be better to start over. If it was new this school year, hose it down and use detergent or Oxyclean and then leave it out in the sun or find a large comercial dryer ON LOW to MED not HOT. If they get too hat they will "melt."
  • 2boysima2boysima Posts: 1,792Registered User Senior Member
    Just purchased in Sept...not one of the inexpensive ones.

    Hose down sounds like a good idea...although I doubt it will get done if it's going to need to get left out to dry in the quad for all to see!
  • jrparjrpar Posts: 2,083Registered User Senior Member
    I'd buy a new cheap one.
  • newmassdadnewmassdad Posts: 3,848Registered User Senior Member
    They are easy to wash.

    The problem is drying them before mildew sets in.

    They are just a bunch of foam.

    IF you have a wet/dry vacuum, you might try extracting water with the vacuum.

    If you really wanted to get most of the water out to speed up drying, you could do it with a very large plastic bag - perhaps a jumbo contractor's bag. Put the wet thing in the bag. close it up around the nozzle of the wet/dry vac. Turn the vac on while keeping a seal around the nozzle. Watch air pressur do its work as the bag and contents shrink down as the water and air are sucked out.

    BTW, this trick is a good way to get big foam cushions into tight cases, too.
  • itstoomuchitstoomuch Posts: 1,745. Senior Member
    Use the cartoon method: Find a road building crew that is willing to "roll" the foam.
  • fendergirlfendergirl Posts: 4,651Registered User Senior Member
    go to an ollies or something and buy a new one for 5 bucks. I still have the same one from freshman year and that was six years ago.
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