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Red Egg White...Safe to Use in Baking?

CDN_dancerCDN_dancer Posts: 2,579Registered User Senior Member
edited July 2012 in Parent Cafe
My friends and I are trying to bake a cake as a surprise for another friend's birthday. Now, we cracked open an egg and were very surprised to find what should have been the egg white was actually more of a blood-red in colour. We tried Googling, but all we found was info for blood spots on the egg yolk. Anyone else come across this before? Is the egg still safe to use?
Post edited by CDN_dancer on

Replies to: Red Egg White...Safe to Use in Baking?

  • futurenyustudentfuturenyustudent Posts: 5,366Registered User Senior Member
    Eww. I wouldn't.
  • CDN_dancerCDN_dancer Posts: 2,579Registered User Senior Member
    Yeah...it just so happens our friend's roommate had also bought some cake mix so we're starting all over. Now I'm just curious whether anyone has encountered this, and what it is exactly...
  • SoCalGal09SoCalGal09 Posts: 615Registered User Member
    From WikiAnswers: "These are called blood spots. Blood spots are the result of broken capillaries in the reproductive system. When a capillary ruptures, a drop of blood leaks out and becomes part of the egg. The presence of a blood spot does not mean the egg is fertile or that an embryo is beginning to form. Egg processors try to identify and remove all eggs containing blood spots before eggs go into the carton. Occasionally one is missed, but if the blood spot is small, it can be removed and the egg used. They are harmless and do not mean the egg is inedible. Small ones disappear when you are cooking the egg. Some people pick them out with a spoon before cooking."
  • RachachaRachacha Posts: 1,266Registered User Senior Member
    Where did you get the eggs? If they are pasteurized eggs bought at a store, it should be OK, since the coloring in the egg yolk is most often a by-product of the diet of the chicken that laid it. That being said, if you bought it fresh from a farm or plucked it from your own coop, or don't know where it came from at all, I would play it safe and not use it....
  • interesteddadinteresteddad Posts: 23,679Registered User Senior Member
    She said the egg WHITE was blood red in color. Not spots on the yolk. The whole egg white.

    I would not, personally, use that egg, regardless where it was purchased or what it said on the package. Life is too short for salmonella poisoning or whatever. I also will not use an egg with a cracked shell.
  • hillbillyzhillbillyz Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    we just got one too ... where the entire white is red ... just tried to look it up but no where can I find it ... wierd ... every thing is onthe web ... we did not use it just incase... but would still like to know why it is ...
  • coureurcoureur Posts: 11,386Registered User Senior Member
    Red egg white:

    Life is Like a Long Journey: RED Egg White!!!

    It may mean the egg is spoiled.
  • VeryHappyVeryHappy Posts: 11,709Registered User Senior Member
    I wonder if the egg was fertilized and started to develop.

    Whatever -- throw it out!!
  • NonnieNonnie Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    I have my own hens. I also recieved a nice red surprise! No, it's not a fertile egg. I don't have a rooster. It is too much cyclopropene fatty acid. For my hens, one tends to favor the weeds we have in our back yard.

    I suppose though that the students who posted this are now long gone.
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