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Another Ranking System 20 Smartest Colleges

Mom24boysMom24boys Posts: 508Registered User Member
edited November 2012 in Parents Forum
This ranking system is supposed to identify the universities in America with the smartest students.

The 20 Smartest Colleges In America - Yahoo! Finance

You can link to the study and see how these rating compare to USNWR ratings and a further break down by types of intelligence. According to the study Darmouth students did best in attention, RHIT in memory, Harvard in processing speed, MIT in problem solving and Yale in Flexibility.
Post edited by Mom24boys on
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Replies to: Another Ranking System 20 Smartest Colleges

  • HuntHunt Posts: 22,828Registered User Senior Member
    It strikes me as a fairly crude tool, with a lot of questions (for example, do the students at University of Portland who choose to play this game represent the student body in general?). But the rough correlation to SAT scores is interesting. Also, when you look at the big list, there are some surprises in the upper reaches, but not many at all in the lower reaches.
  • bovertinebovertine Posts: 3,303Registered User Senior Member
    Where's Caltech?
  • bclintonkbclintonk Posts: 6,487Registered User Senior Member
    This looks like a very silly ranking to me, but just to stir the pot . . . it's interesting to see some heavy hitters that didn't make the "top 20," including:

    #21 Emory
    #31 Brown
    #35 Notre Dame
    #39 Princeton
    #47 Rice
    #48 Johns Hopkins
    #52 Cornell
    #61 Columbia
    #121 Georgetown
  • SlitheyToveSlitheyTove Posts: 5,878Registered User Senior Member
    bovertine, it's not mentioned at all. From the full study (link is within the article):
    We ranked institutions based on their median Grand Index score. The full list includes all institutions with at least 50 users who had complete score and demographic data. This cutoff was chosen in order to improve the reliability of our findings while still providing good coverage across a large number of schools. The cutoff resulted in a final total sample of 60,366 users (median age = 21.1 years, 49.4% female), who were affiliated with 411 distinct institutions. The top 50 schools on the Grand Index are shown on the next page. The full list is available at the end of this document.

    I'm guessing that Caltech was just too small to generate a large enough sample size. I suppose if Caltech really cared, the students could easily hack the results--probably any college population could--because there are limitations to the study. For instance,
    Our approach to identifying users as university students based on their email address, IP address and age is imperfect. Some of these users may in fact be university-age staff or graduate students. In addition, a login to Lumosity from a particular university network is not necessarily an indicator of a lasting affiliation with university, but it was useful in allowing us to augment the number of users available for a number of schools.

    Now I've got a hankering to go play Word Bubbles... :)
  • OivoivOivoiv Posts: 194- Junior Member
    Finally, undeniable proof of what I've suspected all along: Northeastern is better than Princeton.
  • colorado_momcolorado_mom Posts: 6,482Registered User Senior Member
    Interesting...MIT and CMU and R-H and WPI.... but no CalTech or Harvey Mudd or Olin.
  • QuantMechQuantMech Posts: 5,695Registered User Senior Member
    Re: Caltech. I'll offer the hypothesis that Caltech students don't play the Luminosity games at all, making them in fact the smartest. I'm a little surprised that MIT students have time to play.

    (Of course, I am hanging out on CC, so have no justification to throw stones from my glass house.)
  • wbentleywbentley Posts: 1Registered User New Member
    CalTech, Mudd, etc. are probably just too small.
  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Posts: 19,936Super Moderator Senior Member
    They tested 400 of the 3000+ colleges out there. Does that actually mean anything?
  • collegealum314collegealum314 Posts: 6,658Registered User Senior Member
    Are there really 3000 colleges?
  • LoremIpsumLoremIpsum Posts: 3,497Registered User Senior Member
    Only 7 points separate the first 37 schools on the list. In some schools, the sample could include the brighter kids interested in taking on a challenge; in others, the sample could mainly include the slackers, because the better students are too busy taking harder classes, extra classes, or pursuing multiple ECs. Without some standardized sample group, the results are as useless as Internet polls -- depending on the website, one might list Steve Jobs as "most influential" and another Justin Bieber.

    Brown scored low because the only ones playing the game were stoned at the time. ;)
  • soccerguy315soccerguy315 Posts: 6,698Registered User Senior Member
    11 is probably pretty accurate =P
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Posts: 27,298Registered User Senior Member
    "
    Are there really 3000 colleges?"

    No, college alum. There are the top 20 unis, the top 20 LACs, then every state has a flagship so that's 50, so a total of 90. That's the grand total.

    (Why would 3000 colleges in a country the size of ours be surprising?)
  • OivoivOivoiv Posts: 194- Junior Member
    "(Why would 3000 colleges in a country the size of ours be surprising?)"

    Because it's probably more than the rest of the world combined has?

    (I'm not doubting the 3000+ figure, I'm saying it is pretty amazing that there are so many colleges in the USA.)
  • Erin's DadErin's Dad Posts: 19,936Super Moderator Senior Member
    ^ That's interesting. Then this international set of rankings for 12K universities would be wrong. WORLD | Ranking Web of Universities

    It's actually 2700 four year schools and 1700 two year schools in the US.

    Fast Facts
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