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Ten Myths about Gifted Kids

collegealum314collegealum314 Posts: 6,311Registered User Senior Member
edited November 2012 in Parents Forum
My view: Ten myths about gifted students and programs for gifted – Schools of Thought - CNN.com Blogs

This is from cnn.com. It calls itself a blog but it's on the regular website--not sure it is allowed.
Post edited by collegealum314 on
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Replies to: Ten Myths about Gifted Kids

  • emeraldkity4emeraldkity4 Posts: 32,496Registered User Senior Member
    I've linked to blogs run by newssites before- but you are right- blogs aren't allowed.
  • momofthreeboysmomofthreeboys Posts: 11,281Registered User Senior Member
    Personally, I think there is a difference between precocious (young) kids and truly gifted kids but the distinction often isn't seen until between puberty and adulthood
  • romanigypsyeyesromanigypsyeyes Posts: 22,302Registered User Senior Member
    Does anyone actually believe 1-4 or 6?
  • LoremIpsumLoremIpsum Posts: 3,497Registered User Senior Member
    It's not a bad article, but there really isn't a lot of meat in it. Gifted kids are all different and most would benefit from special programs? Isn't that pretty much a "duh!" analysis?

    Statistics might be useful. For example, the author writes:
    Some are extreme extroverts, while others are introverts. There is no one type of person or personality we can pinpoint as gifted.

    While that it true, the gifted tend to be disproportionately introverts and the highly gifted test as Meyers-Briggs introverts 75-80% of the time.
  • J'adoubeJ'adoube Posts: 2,044Registered User Senior Member
    Funny about #7. S's new first grade gifted program teacher quit after the first year in the program. Asked whether it was that difficult to deal with the gifted children, she replied, "no, it was the parents it was difficult to deal with."
  • psych_psych_ Posts: 1,418Registered User Senior Member
    ^
    The Meyers-Briggs is NOT a well-validated personality inventory! There are much, much more psychometricly sound ones available, and so its annoying that the Meyers-Briggs is treated as the "gold standard" by so many people when it is anything but!
  • wis75wis75 Posts: 8,577Registered User Senior Member
    This topic recurs every so often.

    It is true no personality type is associated with high intelligence. I learned the 75% of highly gifted being introverted while 75% of the general population is extroverted (and of course there is a continuum). Makes it even harder for many gifted- they don't fit general societal norms for preferred social behavior. Also hard to be a gifted extrovert- try getting your college friends to do what you like to do, sigh. And- most teachers will be extroverts and not understand the introverted students. Been there, done that. Wish so much of the literature had been available decades before it came out. Myth #10 is my favorite- I hate it when people try to say every child is gifted (perhaps some of us are just more gifted than others).
  • ModadunnModadunn Posts: 6,196Registered User Senior Member
    Oh.my.word. Yes, this conversation comes up every so often, and I think some of the self-promoting dribble of that article is one of our core issues as a country. So.. gifted students shouldn't help out those who struggle because it's frustrating? While I might agree that gifted kids should be challenged, it also might help their EQ to find some empathy in helping someone else. And education isn't just about the academics. We need people who can work together. And pulling all the gifted from the regular classroom only creates a sense of truth to thinking you're always the smartest guy in the world. Ugh.

    I liked my son used to to peer tutor. It taught him to recognize different learning styles and appreciate what others bring to the table. However, I admit we moved him to a private school in 8th grade. While he was still good at peer tutoring, there was no gifted and talented "program" but it definitely pushed him to be as academically challenged as he needed it to be.
  • collegealum314collegealum314 Posts: 6,311Registered User Senior Member
    It's one thing to do peer tutoring out of one's own volition. It's another thing to expect/force the smart kids to spend less time learning and instead do the job of the teachers. If we do expect this from them, maybe they should get a portion of the salary and benefits of the teachers they are assisting.
    And pulling all the gifted from the regular classroom only creates a sense of truth to thinking you're always the smartest guy in the world. Ugh.

    Or they won't think they are the smartest guy in the world because they will be put in an environment where they aren't the smartest person in the room.
  • KKmamaKKmama Posts: 1,488Registered User Senior Member
    My daughter's learning disabled class is ahead of her advanced class in pre-algebra. The LD kids are doing their homework and the advanced kids can't be bothered....

    Must be crazy trying to teach gifted kids. When my youngest was in kindergarten she was not happy about having to "learn" the alphabet. They had to bring in items for show and tell which started with the letter of the week. She had such delightful contributions as dust bunnies, lint, pickled beets (decided that week to concentrate on adjectives rather than subjects....), toe nails.
  • lake42kslake42ks Posts: 1,171Registered User Member
    It seems 20-30% of parents think their first-kids are in the top 0.1%, not quite as high as #10 in the article. But, I don't see anything wrong with parents being proud of their kids. What is gifted anyway? I'm pretty happy with my kids, labeled gifted or not.
  • VladenschlutteVladenschlutte Posts: 3,168Registered User Senior Member
    The Meyers-Briggs is NOT a well-validated personality inventory! There are much, much more psychometricly sound ones available, and so its annoying that the Meyers-Briggs is treated as the "gold standard" by so many people when it is anything but!

    I've always suspected these personality tests are just entertainment. For that purpose, Meyers-Briggs is great. It's easy to take, easy to understand the results, and readily accessible online.
  • LoremIpsumLoremIpsum Posts: 3,497Registered User Senior Member
    And pulling all the gifted from the regular classroom only creates a sense of truth to thinking you're always the smartest guy in the world. Ugh.

    When your class peers are smarter, the teacher can teach at a faster pace with less repetition. Friendly rivalries between roughly-equal peers can also cause students to go well above and beyond the class requirements as they seek to show off their advanced skills.
  • PhilovitistPhilovitist Posts: 2,737Registered User Senior Member
    And pulling all the gifted from the regular classroom only creates a sense of truth to thinking you're always the smartest guy in the world. Ugh.

    lol and being surrounded by idiots doesn't?
  • mathmommathmom Posts: 22,956Registered User Senior Member
    Or they won't think they are the smartest guy in the world because they will be put in an environment where they aren't the smartest person in the room.
    Exactly. We were at some physics demo as part of a Science Fair week and my oldest (3rd grade the year before gifted program started) kept answering every questions. The presenter made some comment and some little girl said "Oh yes, mathson is the smartest kid in 3rd grade!" He really didn't need to hear that. The only thing I ever wanted for him was for him not to be the smartest kid in the room - he got it in spades in college. He was both precocious and gifted, and luckily for us almost every teacher he ever had recognized it starting in pre-school and most enjoyed him. Never had him tested beyond what the school did, because there was never any question.

    My younger son had pretty much the opposite experience. He always seemed to be behind the school program and was not precocious at all, but according to an IQ test, he's gifted.

    I didn't think much of our school's gifted program, and for my oldest it was grossly inadequate - he'd have advanced a lot faster with homeschooling and we considered it often, but in the end he wanted to be with friends so we did a lot of supplementing after school and some targeted advancement in math where the boredom factor was highest.
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