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Which College Majors Lead Graduates to Their Parents’ Basements

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Replies to: Which College Majors Lead Graduates to Their Parents’ Basements

  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Registered User Posts: 40,488 Senior Member

    "agree with you 100 percent. However, there is selection bias in these types of surveys as the people with "getup and go" tend to stick through the more difficult majors like engineering or accounting. People who aren't self-starters tend to end up in the majors that are easier academically."

    Oh please. Self-starting is a trait agnostic of major.
  • ZinheadZinhead Registered User Posts: 1,927 Senior Member
    edited November 2015
    ^^^^ People without "getup and go" or who are not self-starters tend not to do well in weed out classes which are concentrated in the STEM fields that did well in this survey.
  • FallGirlFallGirl Registered User Posts: 7,132 Senior Member
    edited November 2015
    ^ I don't get that. A kid with a natural aptitude for a STEM major might make it through the weed out classes just fine, but not particularly be a self starter.

    There are plenty of self starters in liberal arts who are getting internships, etc.
  • DecideSomeHowDecideSomeHow Registered User Posts: 646 Member
    I get what zinhead is trying to say. As an engineeing undergrad I saw plenty of folks switch to "something else" and very few switch into engineering. Based solely on thainobservation, It would be easy, but wrong, to conclude that the self starters were all in engineering.

    I'd bet money that the primary reason for low numbers at home for engineeing is driven by a multitude of factors. Two come to mind - a pre defined career starting point that allows employers and student to match up easily, and lack of technical employers at home to even get a job.
  • KnoxpatchKnoxpatch Registered User Posts: 351 Member
    My employed 2015 spring BSN grad is living at home. She works nights so we see each other occasionally on either end of her 12-hour shifts. And yes, she's saving money for a condo or house. So far, it's working.

    In the U.S., there is a lot of angst about moving back home and I agree with many here that the percentages are only part of the story. Not all graduates who live at home--heck, I doubt many--are sitting around watching TV.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Registered User Posts: 80,677 Senior Member
    <<<
    Not all graduates who live at home--heck, I doubt many--are sitting around watching TV.
    <<<

    Of course not.

    However, the "living in the parents' basement" label is often short-hand for "failure to launch, jobless or part-time-employed, and spends too much time watching TV or playing video games."

    I don't think we're applying that label to a fully-employed graduate who is living at home for sensible reasons (maybe paying off a student loan, saving for a down payment, getting married soon, etc)
  • MarianMarian Registered User Posts: 11,936 Senior Member
    edited November 2015
    @mom2collegekids Unfortunately, though, the stigma of failure surrounds those young people who live with their parents, even if they are gainfully employed.

    There's a young woman at my office who started in a relatively routine job about a year ago and has already been earmarked for great things. It took management about a month to realize that she's the best thing to hit the department in years, and they restructured her job to give her the kind of experience that will prepare her for greater responsibilities -- which will be coming very soon. She is obviously a future superstar.

    But she gets funny looks when she tells people that she lives with her parents.

    Why does she live with her parents? Because they enjoy each other's company. It's a simple as that. She probably won't move out until she has a specific reason -- like marriage or a move to a different city.
  • LucieTheLakieLucieTheLakie Registered User Posts: 3,622 Senior Member
    I find graduates who choose to live at home with their parents (when they're welcome!) in order to save funds or pay off loans a lot more commendable than those who take on debt or spend every last cent they earn to maintain a life they cannot truly afford. Obviously, if a job offer comes in another city, it's not going to be possible to live with the folks, but if it's a reasonable option, why wouldn't you? If it bothers your co-workers, just don't share that info.

    Many of my neighbors welcome their children back home after they graduate, and almost all of those students are gainfully employed. They're working to pay off loans, save up for first homes or weddings, and consolidating resources with their folks. Many cultures do this, and this whole "living in the basement" trope is just silly. And if anybody bothered to read the article the OP posted, he pretty much concedes that the entire premise of the article is stupid:
    It’s an old joke among humanities majors: You may be nourishing the soul, but when you graduate, it’s back to living with your parents while you look for a job with that degree.

    To test the truth of this assertion, TIME examined five years of Census data on those with Bachelor’s degrees, accounting for both their field of study and whether they are listed as living with at least one parent. Of course, this could mean a person is in a graduate program and still using his or her home address. And living at home doesn’t mean a person is unemployed. Census data suggests most such individuals do have jobs.

    Like which school you attend, what you major in seems to have the most bearing on the years just after school. While half of English majors live at home right out of college–including this reporter, for several months–only about a third of Engineering majors do. By age 29, however, the difference has dropped to 5 points (12 percent of English majors and 7 percent of Engineering majors.) This is generally true across the board.

    So major in what you like.
    http://time.com/4106297/college-degrees-parents-house/



  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 50,217 Senior Member
    If my s's lived nearby, they would have been welcome to live home if they wanted (which unfortunately they did not). One s lived in the area for a year, about a year and a half after graduation. He wanted to live where the young folks lived, not with his parents. And it would have given him a 2 hr commute to work each way anyway, which was ridiculous.
  • paul2752paul2752 Registered User Posts: 4,294 Senior Member
    I found particularly strange that Americans IN GENERAL make fun of adults who live with their parents. I mean if you dont have jobs and wastes your life then anyone would think them as losers, but in other cultures,kids still live with their parents even after graduating unless they get married or get a job offer from far away
  • MarianMarian Registered User Posts: 11,936 Senior Member
    @jym626 Family attitudes differ. My daughter lived in our area for her first 3 years after graduation. My husband was adamant that she should not live with us. She didn't want to live with us anyway because she wanted a shorter commute to her job. But if she had wanted to live with us, she would have been unwelcome -- at least from her father's point of view. To him, living on your own is a crucial part of becoming an independent young adult.

    I don't agree with him, but nothing I could say would change his mind.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 50,217 Senior Member
    Ouch, Marian! Tossing the chick out of the nest. Am guessing she had the wings to fly and your DH knew it.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Registered User Posts: 80,677 Senior Member
    >>>
    But she gets funny looks when she tells people that she lives with her parents.

    Why does she live with her parents? Because they enjoy each other's company. It's a simple as that. She probably won't move out until she has a specific reason -- like marriage or a move to a different city.
    >>>


    Well, that's unfortunate that people can't tell the difference between moocher and a thoughtful decision. If the parents and adult children have a respectful relationship, and the young adults saving money on rent, then that's a wise thing to do.
  • MatachinesMatachines Registered User Posts: 222 Junior Member
    Honestly I would't mind moving back home after school. I know this article is supposed to mean "jobless after college", but IMO working and living at home would be a great way to pay off debt quickly. Then again my family/culture doesn't have the stigma against living at home after 18 like many Americans do :p
This discussion has been closed.