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U Kentucky shifting away from merit aid

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Replies to: U Kentucky shifting away from merit aid

  • LOUKYDADLOUKYDAD Registered User Posts: 445 Member
    Based on comments of the Provost quoted in the article, stating that they are expecting to lose some NMFs, I would assume the Patterson scholarship (automatic full ride) is going away.

    Kentucky has a program called Governors Scholars. About a 1000 or so KY high school juniors every year are chosen to attend a summer program on a college campus between their junior and senior years. Once they are Governors Scholars, all the in-state publics give significant automatic scholarships to these kids, including UK. Full tuition typically. UK currently does also, but has been raising the ACT bar to get their top award (Presidential scholarship, which is full tuition). Used to be 28 at UK, but they raised it to 31 a couple of years ago. As they raised the requirement a lot more Governors Scholar kids who didn't have the ACT score have been ending up at the directionals, but still I bet there are significantly more Governors Scholars at UK than NMFs. I wonder how the Presidential scholarship will be affected by these changes. This is still a merit rather than need based award, albeit for instate kids only.
  • BingeWatcherBingeWatcher Registered User Posts: 376 Member
    @LOUKYDAD look at Texas Tech, FULL RIDE for NMF, Big 12, also look At Oklahoma State, I think they may have a Full ride also.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,267 Senior Member
    The small scholarships will probably go - and the merit for low-ish stats also (like the scholarships for ACT25/SAT 1200 and HS GPA 3.3).

    I doubt UK is giving merit aid to kids with stats that low anyway, unless they've got some exceptional ECs or have some other hook.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 60,373 Senior Member
    I doubt UK is giving merit aid to kids with stats that low anyway, unless they've got some exceptional ECs or have some other hook.

    http://www.uky.edu/financialaid/scholarship-incoming-freshmen

    3.30 / 26 = $1,500 per year for residents
    3.00 / 25 = $7,000 per year for non-residents (non-resident tuition surcharge is $15,000 per year)

    Wording seems to imply that they are automatic but first come first served until the money runs out.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,267 Senior Member
    edited January 24
    3.30 / 26 = $1,500 per year for residents
    3.00 / 25 = $7,000 per year for non-residents (non-resident tuition surcharge is $15,000 per year)

    Wording seems to imply that they are automatic but first come first served until the money runs out.

    I don't see where it says the scholarships are automatic, and in any case, for in-state residents, $1,500/year isn't much, even when going to a state school.
  • PurpleTitanPurpleTitan Registered User Posts: 9,860 Senior Member
    ^ It's really hard to match revenues with expenditures, though. At most publics now, state support is so small that you can shift it all to one specific pot (say, faculty and staff salaries) and then you can say with a straight face that no taxpayer money is spent on OOS scholarships. But in the case of the 'Bama football revenues, for instance, it's not like they light all that money on fire if they don't spend it on merit scholarships; the football money would be directed to fin aid or to hire more profs, etc., so spending it on merit scholarships means less fin aid or spending on salaries (or those areas would have to be covered by taxpayer funding or other sources).
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 29,378 Senior Member
    @roethliger: that's the point - the small merit scholarships are likely to go because they don't bring in anybody they really want and probably cover quite a few residents or non residents - the residents would be covered by need based aid if necessary and the non residents would have to have higher stats to get scholarships.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Registered User Posts: 82,021 Senior Member
    Bama doesn't fund its merit from taxpayers.

    >>
    That split is currently 90 percent in favor of non-need-based aid. By 2021, the university hopes to skew it largely the other way, to be 65 percent need-based aid.
    <<<

    Is any of that 10% of need based grants from Pell Grants?
  • LOUKYDADLOUKYDAD Registered User Posts: 445 Member
    edited January 25
    The role of the state flagship (UK) versus the other public universities in the state (Western K, Eastern K, Northern K, Morehead State, Murray State) came to mind as I read the comments of UK officials. Everyone of the directionals has a significantly lower cost of attendance than UK I believe. 70% or even lower compared to UK. Shouldn't the kids who have an unmet financial need be steered towards the lower cost options already available if they have unmet financial need?

    As you read the comments of the provost and the president on this subject about UK's mission to the citizens of Kentucky, they would seem to be imagining UK is the only available option, when in reality that isn't the case at all.

    UK as the flagship should see its place differently than the other publics in the state, as a research U and an engine for economic development, bringing high tech and other industries to the state. Companies want to locate in a state where they will have access to the best and the brightest. This move is not going to be helpful in this regard.
  • mom2collegekidsmom2collegekids Registered User Posts: 82,021 Senior Member
    <<<
    The most important rating to increase one's ranking as a research U is underscored by.....RESEARCH. Specifically original research/publications by the Profs and grad students.
    <<<

    Univ of Kentucky has a med school and is the agriculture land grant school . Both of those typically mean more research dollars than another state's flagship that doesn't have those two things.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 29,378 Senior Member
    @LOUKYDAD: the idea is to steer students toward the institution matching their abilities, not their parents' finances. This is what American universities used to be about until about 10 years ago. They're prioritizing state residents, which makes sense. This also used to be what American universities used to be about.
    Research shows that students who come from lower income backgrounds benefit the most from being among academic peers and are more likely to graduate if they study at institutions that 1° meet their financial need and 2° surrounds them by equally bright kids.
    Steering top students away from UK does the opposite. It leads to needless waste of talent and money.
    Essentially, they want Kentucky to be a meritocracy - if you achieve the level necessary for UK, you get to go there.
    If you come from outside Kentucky and want to go there, you'll need to demonstrate what you bring to the table; if you don't bring money, you'll need to bring higher stats.
    BTW that's also how Alabama works: OOS scholarships aren't the same as instate ones, and 32 ACT is top 2% so an OOS student who currently scores a 25 wouldn't have much incentive to attend UA, just like they shouldn't be the focus of scholarships at UK.
  • LOUKYDADLOUKYDAD Registered User Posts: 445 Member
    The issues UA and UK have with graduation and retention rates aren't new. They precede the beginning of the merit rat race as they are calling it. Personally I would expect it to get worse as they lose the high achieving students who were there because of merit money.
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