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Why don't Colleges teach students how to speak ?

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Replies to: Why don't Colleges teach students how to speak ?

  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 3,504 Senior Member
    Sarcasm is not always "opposite"...most of us are not stupid here.

    Definition of sarcasm
    1
    : a sharp and often satirical or ironic utterance designed to cut or give pain
    2
    a : a mode of satirical wit depending for its effect on bitter, caustic, and often ironic language that is usually directed against an individual
    b : the use or language of sarcasm

    Look, I'm a woman, and frankly, I'm not offended here. I'm tired of people pulling out the woman flag to defend silliness. My opinion. Take it or leave it, but stop trying to invalidate it.
  • malvernvarnamalvernvarna Registered User Posts: 129 Junior Member
    I would like to point out that the word "like" may be perceived as overused because it is not used only as a filler word. I'm not talking about the dictionary usage but rather something like this:

    I was talking to Carol the other day, and, like, she was being so annoying. I, like, walked over and she was like, "What are you wearing?" And I was like, "Um, my clothes, what does it look like?" And she was like, "Ugh, you look like a fire hydrant." I swear I almost punched her, like what the heck?!

    If I told my friends a story like that (I tried to be accurate to our casual speech patterns) then some of the "likes" would be filler, some would be used "correctly," and many of them would be used in place of the word "said." I think we do this because saying someone "was like, "blah blah blah"" instead of "said, "blah blah blah"" softens the declaration and leaves more room for doubt. "Said" suggests a direct quote, while "was like" suggests paraphrasing and directs blame away from the speaker if it turns out that they didn't tell the story exactly right.

    I guess my point is that the use of "like" is more complicated than has been assumed. It's actually a rather intelligent and informative use of language, in my opinion.

    Disclaimer: I haven't studied this stuff or anything; this is only an observation based on my personal experience as a current teenager.
  • halcyonheatherhalcyonheather Registered User Posts: 8,984 Senior Member
    I guess my point is that the use of "like" is more complicated than has been assumed. It's actually a rather intelligent and informative use of language, in my opinion.
    I agree that "like" has meaning and isn't just an alternative to "um." On the positive side, it indicates that you're humble about your opinions and willing to change them. On the negative side, it indicates that you don't want to own up to your own thoughts. It's not really fair to single out "like," though. I don't say "like" very much, but I'm always saying that something is kind of, sort of, maybe, probably, essentially, along the lines of something else.
  • snarlatronsnarlatron Registered User Posts: 1,433 Senior Member
    What a frustrating thread and so filled with ad hominem, the last vestige of someone out of ideas. I realize that today's zeitgeist is that everyone is great and "I'm OK, you're OK" but the reality is that professional success can hinge on your dress and the way you use language. Yes, some successful types wear jeans In the office, some mangle language. But my kids will understand that if you style a Mohawk and say "whatevz" every other sentence, you're not getting the job, the contract, or the client. This has nothing to do with The Hamptons or snobbery or elitism. It is about the respect and integrity a professional has for his craft and clients. I'm bracing for the name-calling but I am confident that those in the real world can relate.
  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 3,504 Senior Member
    @snarlatron you are such a smartypants!!! (Best name calling I could come up with, as I agree!!)
  • collegedad13collegedad13 Registered User Posts: 276 Junior Member
    @snarlton I am in the real world. I am a professional. People pay for skills. They really don't care how you look or whether you use the word "like". I hope my kids understand that
  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 3,504 Senior Member
    @collegedad13 you have to admit it depends on the job. For most jobs, there are enough skilled people to allow an employer to be choosy. If the job never requires you to be see or heard by clients, then super. But somebody has to bring in the clients, buyers, people who pay the bills, and those who must interact with them need to have THOSE skills.
  • blprofblprof Registered User Posts: 683 Member
    So is the term "well-spoken" now obsolete? Or code for an "-ism"? I am on a search committee right now and one of the job requirements is strong oral and written communication skills, so I don't know what world some of these posters are living in.
  • collegedad13collegedad13 Registered User Posts: 276 Junior Member
    @HRSMom I think the question is what are those skills. In hiring a a doctor isn't it more important to have a MD do a really good job at figuring out what is wrong with you or prescribing the right meds. Bedside manor can only take you so far. Does anybody really care how a surgeon speaks?
  • blprofblprof Registered User Posts: 683 Member
    Yes, I think many probably do.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 350 Member
    @collegedad13

    I don't think most patients are in a position to judge how good a surgeon is, unless something goes so horribly wrong it results in a malpractice suit. So I think patients mostly evaluate their doctor on their bedside manor. How hospitals do their hiring is a different story.
  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 3,504 Senior Member
    I'd want both. But then, I'm the client. Now If this was the doctor that examines, not me, but my scans from the whatchamacallit machine, and develops a plan to cure me and mixes the med protocol, then I really don't care. He can be a total introvert wearing a bunny suit. As long as I don't see him.

    Too many doctors have no bedside manner I think.

    A better example perhaps a programmer? If I'm the client, I want X. A person with good communication skills is sent out to get my specs and sell me on your delivery. I don't care who delivers, what she hears or how much he upspeaks (is that still a word that way)?

    So I see your point, but you must admit, sometimes you may need the soft skills too.
  • collegedad13collegedad13 Registered User Posts: 276 Junior Member
    I had shoulder surgery and I spent alot of time and checked out the Drs. reputation before he did the surgery. One of my kids needs to see a specialist and we actively checked out the specialists reputation before the appointment was made. When my dad was sick and dying for many months I spent a lot of time in the hospital questioning doctors and checking out their reputation.
  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 3,504 Senior Member
    I think a lot of this is just a fad. Nobody says groovey or twenty three skeedoo anymore, right?
  • collegedad13collegedad13 Registered User Posts: 276 Junior Member
    @Hrsmom I do agree sometimes you need the soft skills.

    Last summer one of my kids was at a major tech company as an intern. Most of the people on their team could barely communicate at all. However they were great coders. There is no easy answer
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