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Betsy DeVos statement on historically black colleges and universities

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Replies to: Betsy DeVos statement on historically black colleges and universities

  • ZinheadZinhead Registered User Posts: 2,562 Senior Member
    edited February 28
    So why did Betsy DeVos release the statement about HBCU's?

    http://www.cbsnews.com/news/trump-issues-executive-orders-on-hbcus-environmental-regulations/
    President Trump will sign an executive order to bolster historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) on Tuesday. The order will do this by moving the moving the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which was previously part of the Department of Education, back to the White House.

    The administration says this action will encourage strategic partnerships with other agencies and outside groups by giving it greater visibility. The United Negro College Fund had requested that Mr. Trump move the Initiative to the White House and be led by a person “who reports to a senior advisor to the president,” according to The Washington Post.

    Dozens of HBCU leaders gathered at the White House on Monday where they briefly met Mr. Trump in the Oval Office before meeting with Vice President Mike Pence. The order is a signal that the Trump administration plans to make HBCUs a priority, boosting Trump’s “urban agenda,” a senior White House office told reporters in a briefing.

    The White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities was started by President Jimmy Carter, but the Trump administration says the office has “lost track because they didn’t have the full force of the White House behind it.”

    Nice for the OP to bury the message on this. Fake news indeed.
  • Much2learnMuch2learn Registered User Posts: 4,306 Senior Member
    @zinhead They way I read this, it doesn't really do anything except change a line of reporting? No specific support, funding or actions that actually provide support.
  • roethlisburgerroethlisburger Registered User Posts: 1,578 Senior Member
    edited February 28
    @cobrat This also brings up another related issue which was that public schools historically tended to be much more popular among Northern/NE states than in the southern states, especially before the antebellum because of the feudalistic attitudes among the prevailing southern White local elites who felt their taxes to support the education of poorer Whites was already offensive to their sensibilities....the idea of doing so to support the education of free Blacks or after the Civil War, the Black populace was considered by most of them to be beyond the pale.

    Historically, this misses the mark in that the main problem with children attending public schools in the South even into the early 20th century was they were still needed on the farm. Those White local elites could have built a grandiose building, and hired top notch teachers, but if kids needed to work, those teachers would be lecturing to a nearly empty classroom. It also ignores how prevalent private schools were in the NE due to the large Catholic presence, and how BS were where the NE elite sent their kids. And I'm not sure how you connected this to vouchers. Some of the largest voucher programs skew disproportionately toward minorities.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 62,176 Senior Member
    edited February 28
    Zinhead wrote:
    Nice for the OP to bury the message on this. Fake news indeed.

    What is fake about DeVos' actual statement, straight from the government DoE web site this morning?

    In terms of the executive order, it was not signed or published earlier today (when the DeVos statement was available), but it appears to be published now at https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/02/28/presidential-executive-order-white-house-initiative-promote-excellence .

    The existing White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities is described at https://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/ .
  • FlaParentFlaParent Registered User Posts: 34 Junior Member
    It was, of course, a very ignorant statement that truly twists truth to the breaking point. But those against school choice often do the same thing when failing to recognize self-evident truths.

    Monopolies, by their very nature, are inefficient and often fail to meet their customer's needs. Does anyone think that a monopoly grocery store would do a good job? The very idea is silly on its face. First of all, what is a "good grocery store"? Some would say "Whole Foods" while others might repond "Aldi". Both are very different but serve their demographic well (or go out of business).

    Just think if you could only go to the grocery store that you were "zoned for". Very few would accept that as reasonable. But with schools, for some reason, people accept it. Of course, they buy homes in "good school districts" and game the system of equally good schools until it only exists in their imagination. These are the same people that had "school choice" when they choose to live in a certain district. The poor don't have this hidden "school choice".

    Make no mistake that the poor students trapped in failing schools would be helped tremendously by school choice. Unfortunately, the teacher unions have spun a web of half-truths into supporting the status quo position. What appears as support "for the children" is instead a thinly veiled argument from teachers that don't want to compete for their jobs like everyone else in the private sector.

    Competition hones every industry and monopolies only make sense where it results in infrastructure that isn't overly redundant (think about 10 water companies, each with their own pipes). Of course, most industries don't require this level of infrastructure. And in these cases, you tend to benefit from more competition than from the monopoly.

    Make no mistake that it's no Shangri-La and some student may get less out of the new system. Anecdotal arguments rely on this fact to demonize what would be a change for the better for most students.

    Perfect has been and will always be the enemy of good!
  • ZinheadZinhead Registered User Posts: 2,562 Senior Member
    @ucbalumnus -
    What is fake about DeVos' actual statement, straight from the government DoE web site this morning?

    Your post ignores the real news story here which is the White House initiative on HBCU's. Instead of creating a thread on that issue, you choose to focus on a relatively innocuous press release which brings up a group of responses as rational and programmed as the actors in this video.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XvGmOZ5T6_Y

    This whole thread is fake news.

  • cobratcobrat Registered User Posts: 12,285 Senior Member
    Historically, this misses the mark in that the main problem with children attending public schools in the South even into the early 20th century was they were still needed on the farm. Those White local elites could have built a grandiose building, and hired top notch teachers, but if kids needed to work, those teachers would be lecturing to a nearly empty classroom. It also ignores how prevalent private schools were in the NE due to the large Catholic presence, and how BS were where the NE elite sent their kids.

    @roethlisburger

    You're forgetting the fact that the entire US including the NE/Mid-Atlantic was mostly an agrarian society well into the early 20th century. Also children in the 19th and early 20th centuries were also "needed" to work in the urban factories created in the wake of the industrial revolution in the urban NE so that's a bit of a non-sequitur. In fact, the latter issue was one which concerned both labor movements and concerned socially minded citizens of the period and it is the reason why we have regulations and protections limiting the hours and harsh conditions minors are permitted to work.

    While urbanization started earlier in the NE, we didn't really become a majority urbanized/suburbanized society until after WWII.

    As for the Catholic schools, a large part of why they were founded was due to the strong anti-Catholic prejudices prevalent in the then prevailing WASP dominated mainstream society in the 19th and well into the mid-20th century as shown by the anti-Catholicism expressed by JFK's political opponents in the late '50s/early '60s.

    Incidentally, this was one of the major reasons why Boston College was founded as in the mid-19th century, the strong anti-Catholic/anti-Irish immigration sentiments by many anti-immigrant/anti-Catholic WASPs was such Irish and a few decades later, Italian-Americans weren't always considered "White" by many WASPs of the period.
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