Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community discussions, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

  • Reply to threads, and start your own.
  • Post reviews of your campus visits.
  • Find hundreds of pages of informative articles.
  • Search from over 3 million scholarships.
We've just launched our new college search tool at http://www.collegeconfidential.com/schools. Use this form to provide feedback as we continue to work toward a more robust solution to best meet your needs.

Anyone else feel like it's time to tell expensive colleges "ENOUGH!" (CC Newbie Rant)

1789101113»

Replies to: Anyone else feel like it's time to tell expensive colleges "ENOUGH!" (CC Newbie Rant)

  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,502 Senior Member
    "This is overstating things in the other direction. Some countries such as Denmark actually pay a living stipend for university students on top of free tuition."

    But in nearby Sweden 85% of students graduate with student debt. Tuition is free. But living costs are high and typically not covered by the govt or parents.
  • HRSMomHRSMom Registered User Posts: 4,121 Senior Member
    Also SUNY Purchase is also a state school, cheap for OOS with an autism program called Cornerstone.
  • Sue22Sue22 Registered User Posts: 4,233 Senior Member
    But in nearby Sweden 85% of students graduate with student debt. Tuition is free. But living costs are high and typically not covered by the govt or parents.

    The reasons most students in Sweden take on loans are:
    A. The loans are low-cost and if you don't make a lot after graduation you can get your loans limited to 5% of your income until the age of 49.
    B. Swedish parents generally don't pay a thing toward their kids' education. Not tuition, not books, not room or board. The $19,000 debt the average Swedish student graduates with is not all that far off the cost to feed, clothe, entertain and pay the additional utility use for a kid for 4 years.
    C. Most Swedish kids choose to live away from home while attending college.
  • exlibris97exlibris97 Registered User Posts: 708 Member
    @NashvilletoTexas It's 10% up to $160K this year according to Harvard's website. But Harvard doesn't consider home equity and grants a number of allowances, so I know from personal experience that you can still be asked to pay no more than 10% with higher incomes. That said, if you are high income it isn't unreasonable for them to expect you to pay more.
  • exlibris97exlibris97 Registered User Posts: 708 Member
    edited August 13
    @northwesty It's not really for useful to speak in terms of "Europe". Student aid and college costs differ substantially between the countries. Some are tuition free others are not.

    I also had a good laugh thinking of the Oxford and Cambridge experience as being "bare bones".
  • HazeGreyHazeGrey Registered User Posts: 105 Junior Member
    @exlibris97 Me too. Was comparing in my mind the "dining hall" at the Oxford college where my son will be in October and the food served there for formal hall (the kitchen has their own instagram account!) versus my college experience.
  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,502 Senior Member
    edited August 13
    Haze and Ex --

    Did I miss the memo about Cambridge and Oxford becoming free to attend?

    COA for a Brit is over 20,000 pounds annual last time I looked. So it costs about the same as in-state at a public ivy state flagship here in the states.

    That's a good deal, but so is UVA or UCB or UCLA. As is Harvard on its ample financial aid. None are free, however.
  • HazeGreyHazeGrey Registered User Posts: 105 Junior Member
    UK student tuition is 9250 GBP plus living expenses of about 2000 GBP per term so about 15,000 GBP or less than $20,000 at today's rates. And only 3 years versus 4. Not a bad deal for an Oxford education.
  • Sue22Sue22 Registered User Posts: 4,233 Senior Member
    According to Oxford's tuition and fees web page, annual tuition for students from outside the EU ranges from £15,755 to £23,190, plus a college fee of £7,350. Oxford estimates undergraduate living expenses for 9 months as being between £9,021 and £13,237. A bit of the living expense estimate is personal items but we're still talking about a range of £32,126-43,777 ($41,786-56,940) all in, excluding airfare. Doesn't seem particularly cheap to me.
  • HazeGreyHazeGrey Registered User Posts: 105 Junior Member
    @sue22 wasn't quoting full freight international rate but the U.K. rate. Just did the budget with my son today and for his course (the most expensive one of course at 23,190) we got to a total cost of about $50k for this year not including travel. For someone who wouldn't qualify for fin aid here, I think that's a pretty good deal versus oxford's US peers.
  • northwestynorthwesty Registered User Posts: 2,502 Senior Member
    For a Brit, Oxford sticker price is $23-29k for tuition and living expenses. So basically same as public flagship in state sticker. Or private net price after fin aid for many families. Oxford ain't free. Costs a lot more than most euro universities. So why are you guys bringing up Oxford?
  • rwmannesqrwmannesq Registered User Posts: 138 Junior Member
    That's pretty interesting as my son loves the UK. I'm not completely sure his condition would allow him to succeed there, but that price and shorter time to degree, although not cheap, is very attractive.
1789101113»
Sign In or Register to comment.