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College Board to launch Pre-AP classes in 2018

YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,371 Senior Member
Because the College Board must not make enough money yet, they are launching a new set of Pre-AP courses to be approved by them next fall.

https://pre-ap.collegeboard.org/

Courses are:
Pre-AP Algebra 1
Pre-AP Biology
Pre-AP English Language Arts 9
Pre-AP World History and Geography
Pre-AP Visual and Performing Arts

So, schools can't use the "Pre-AP" name without approval.

Discuss...
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Replies to: College Board to launch Pre-AP classes in 2018

  • OHMomof2OHMomof2 Registered User Posts: 9,613 Senior Member
    edited September 12
    My kids had classes called "pre-AP" at their high school since at least 2008 when my older son went. They were probably what other high schools would call "honors", though they were faster paced than "regular" there was no weight in GPA for them.

    My kids took pre-AP geometry, pre-AP biology, etc. This school required regular science before AP science so D, for example, took pre-AP Chem then actual AP Chem. The required grade from pre-AP to take AP was like B-, but if you came from regular Chem it was A+, or something like that.

    And the school did use the name, on transcripts and schedules and everything. Maybe that will have to change.
  • evergreen5evergreen5 Registered User Posts: 86 Junior Member
    A student taking "Pre-AP Algebra 1" during high school is unlikely to arrive in an AP calculus course by senior year unless the student somehow squeezes in an additional math course.

    However, it might be interesting to compare "Pre-AP Algebra 1" to Common Core Algebra 1. (Or not.)
  • YnotgoYnotgo Registered User Posts: 3,371 Senior Member
    The Pre-AP FAQ page includes the following:
    Is Pre-AP an honors program?
    No. Pre-AP is a program for all students. All students deserve the opportunity to develop the foundation necessary for college readiness and AP coursework. That’s what Pre-AP courses are designed to do.

    What does “open access” mean?
    It means that participating schools must not establish any barriers to the Pre-AP program. Pre-AP should serve as the baseline standard course for all students across the whole grade level. Only students who require significant accommodations may be exempt from participation at the school’s discretion.

    Can I teach Pre-AP with any textbook?
    Yes. Pre-AP is designed so that you can use and incorporate your existing textbook and curricular resources, but you will need to confirm the alignment of these materials to the course requirements.

  • traveler98traveler98 Registered User Posts: 720 Member
    My student has also taken pre-AP courses since seventh grade, and the school district uses that label purposely because the goal is getting the students ready for AP classes. I guess with the new College Board branding the district will have to come up with another name for the classes that don't fit entirely into the CB designation of pre-AP.
  • evergreen5evergreen5 Registered User Posts: 86 Junior Member
    edited September 12
    Pre-AP is a program for all students. All students deserve the opportunity to develop the foundation necessary for college readiness and AP coursework. That’s what Pre-AP courses are designed to do.
    It means that participating schools must not establish any barriers to the Pre-AP program.
    On the one hand, I am in favor of no barriers. On the other hand, all students should be college-ready? And being ready for AP coursework - presumably within high school - is a step ahead of even that lofty goal.
    Pre-AP should serve as the baseline standard course for all students across the whole grade level.
    Coleman isn't quite satisfied with his CCSS handiwork and wants to make another go at setting standards?
  • shuttlebusshuttlebus Registered User Posts: 154 Junior Member
    Is there going to be a fee for going through the auditing process? (There isn't a fee for going through the AP auditing process.) Are there going to be year-end exams for these Pre-AP classes like there are for AP classes?
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 61,504 Senior Member
    In theory, the normal college prep courses should be good for preparing students for college courses, or AP courses in high school for the more advanced students.

    The implied assumption is that college prep courses are often inadequate. Unfortunately, it may be a true assumption in many high schools.
  • MYOS1634MYOS1634 Registered User Posts: 30,437 Senior Member
    edited September 12
    So, essentially, there's going to be a preAP program (expect a rollout of PreAP geometry, algebra2, precalculus, etc) with a branded name and further money for CollegeBoard whi can then bar schools from offering "preAP" classes without their imprimatur.... And a competitor for common core (I'm sure there's a market for parents whindont want common core classes and will thus willingly enroll their kids.)
    As for "it's for everyone" I assume the goal is to increase access to AP... And thus increase the customer base... Good fornsociety, good for CollegeBoard...But if parents know preAP is open to all and honors is for kids who got a B or higher, there'll be a marketing problem for preAP : so I expect this to be twisted pretty quickly into "no institutional barrier to access but for students who are ready for the high demands implied by the AP label".
  • MusakParentMusakParent Registered User Posts: 41 Junior Member
    My eyes are going to roll out of my head. So grateful the college board is finding new and interesting ways to make money.

    But we homeschool so I have general disdain for the college bound money making racket. Somehow my kid is managing straight A's in dual enrollment classes on a college campus without ever touching anything from AP/College Board.
  • Mom2aphysicsgeekMom2aphysicsgeek Registered User Posts: 3,634 Senior Member
    This isn't surprising. Springboard https://springboard.collegeboard.org/ already has CB directly in the curriculum market. What is a little conflict of interest?

    CB obviously wants to influence all of high school curriculum.
  • gwnorthgwnorth Registered User Posts: 71 Junior Member
    We are in Canada and AP at DS19's school is being run as regional congregated program that is by selection only. The AP courses are offered predominantly as grade 12 credits, but the students that are selected enter the program in grade 9. The classes they take in grades 9-11 that lead to the grade 12 AP classes are called "Pre-AP".

    The students that are accepted into the program take 5 of their mandatory subjects for grades 9 & 10 (English, French, Math, Science, Geography/History) at the Pre-AP level and then they are given the choice of what subjects they wish to continue with in grade 11 at the Pre-AP level based on which AP classes they plan to take in grade 12. These Pre-AP classes are accelerated versions of our university stream or U level (what would roughly equate to your Honours level courses. The classes are intended for those students planning on going to university after graduation and represent the highest level courses available as recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Education. AP courses are not recognized by the Ontario Ministry and do not meet the criteria for high school graduation). The intention is for the students to have completed the majority of the grade 12 curriculum by the end of grade 11, basically compacting 4 years into 3. The AP classes are then offered in grade 12 at a level equivalent to first year university. As a result, you can't take the grade 12 AP class without having first completed the appropriate grade 11 Pre-AP prerequisite (and grade 11 requires grade 10 which requires grade 9).

    I presume the idea behind the College Board's new program is to be similar to the IB MY curriculum so that they can generate additional revenue by expanding their pool of potential students.
  • BingeWatcherBingeWatcher Registered User Posts: 448 Member
    Sooooo, now I understand why our school has dropped the "preAP" designation and now calls the classes "IS".
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 25,118 Super Moderator
    edited September 12
    I've been shaking my head at some of the things the College Board has introduced over the last couple of years. I can't sat that this takes the cake, but it does come close. Perhaps there will be one bright side:
    Pre-AP World History and Geography
    I hope HS's will steer 9th graders to that instead of into APHG or APWH. AP classes, after all, are ostensibly comparable to intro college courses, so I have a hard time believing (as apparently do many top colleges given their AP credit matrices) that there are that many 9th graders ready for college-level coursework.
  • toowonderfultoowonderful Registered User Posts: 3,371 Senior Member
    @skieurope - I taught about 50 9th graders AP Euro last year.... and had a passing rate higher than the national average for the test (about 60% of my kids scored). Now, to be fair, of the 3 AP classes I teach (the other is APUSH to 10th graders, which had a 75% score rate, and AP World to juniors/seniors, with a 100% score rate last year) the freshman had the highest % of 3s... and only three freshmen scored a 5.... but it can be done.
  • skieuropeskieurope Super Moderator Posts: 25,118 Super Moderator
    @toowonderful I'm not debating that some 9th graders are ready for an AP class, since clearly these kids exist, . However, as many of these students are targeting colleges where 5's are the norm, I would not be the person who touts a freshman getting a 3 as a success story. Regardless, I'm not so much faulting the schools who offer these classes (although they do share some of the blame for drinking the CB's Kool-Aid), and I'm certainly not faulting teachers. I do, however, fault the CB for introducing AP classes like APHG which have no business being AP, IMO.
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