Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community polls, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

GPA and interviewing: is it OK to "round up?"

mafoolmafool Posts: 6,453Registered User Senior Member
edited September 2009 in Parents Forum
When going through the recruiting/interview process senior year, if a college student has a GPA of, say, 3.585, is it dishonest or otherwise objectionable to state it as 3.6?

My initial thought is: you wouldn't round it at all if it were 3.525 (who wants to round down?), so no, don't round up.

But I know that I don't know about such things. Please advise!
Post edited by mafool on
«13

Replies to: GPA and interviewing: is it OK to "round up?"

  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Posts: 26,845Registered User Senior Member
    I think a 3.585 can easily be rounded to a 3.6 with no ethical quandaries, but I think it's amusing on CC to see some kid quote a GPA out to 3 decimal places in the first place. IMO, there's no additional insight from going beyond 1 decimal place. A GPA is 3.6, or 3.8, or 4.1, or whatever the heck it is ... more than 1 decimal place strikes me as overly precious.
  • jdp349jdp349 Posts: 101Registered User Junior Member
    The general rule of thumb is to just round to the hundredths place.
  • mafoolmafool Posts: 6,453Registered User Senior Member
    thank you.

    No preciousness, just how it is figured by the college.
  • ucsd_ucla_daducsd_ucla_dad Posts: 8,573Registered User Senior Member
    I think the student should just state what the GPA is on the official transcript. They shouldn't need to do any rounding or even any calculations themselves.
  • zoosermomzoosermom Posts: 24,076Registered User Senior Member
    When my daughter interviewed at her two top choices, she hadn't yet seen her transcript and had no idea exactly what the GPA was, so she estimated and I don't feel a bit uncomfortable with that. Her applications will indicate her GPA to the hundredth, but I don't think you have to be exact in an interview. I hope not, anyway, because she didn't know her rank AT ALL at that point and her guess was off.
  • PizzagirlPizzagirl Posts: 26,845Registered User Senior Member
    No preciousness, just how it is figured by the college.

    Right - I'm just saying. For example, my kids' GPA's are calculated out to x.xxxx. But there's absolutely no context in which anything other than x.x is relevant. My college GPA was calculated out to a bunch of places too. I just figured it was a computer, but I reported it as x.x when applying for jobs.
  • kitch12kitch12 Posts: 73Registered User Junior Member
    So since my GPA is a 3.99 would it be okay to say in an interview that I have a 4.0?
  • rt needs help!rt needs help! Posts: 63Registered User New Member
    No, that would be called bragging! JUST KIDDING!!!!
  • mantori.suzukimantori.suzuki Posts: 3,347Registered User Senior Member
    Say "about 3.x". Round up. Round down. Quote it to six decimal places. Whatever. If they want more detail, they'll ask.

    And as for you with the 3.99: who cares? Your kind are a dime a dozen here. Go post in the "Chance Me" forum.
  • mafoolmafool Posts: 6,453Registered User Senior Member
    Sorry, I should have been more clear! The question pertains to the resume that will be submitted as part of the recruiting/interview process senior year of college.
  • dadx3dadx3 Posts: 1,509Registered User Senior Member
    I've never asked about GPA or SAT scores in my alumni interviews. The college's evaluation form has no space to record that data. That will be well covered by the paper/electronic application submission to the admissions office, and the admissions office will know what to make of it. The interview is designed to, among other things, allow the applicant to communicate things that are not in the paper/electronic file.

    But I see no ethical problem in rounding the GPA to the nearest tenth.
  • kitch12kitch12 Posts: 73Registered User Junior Member
    And as for you with the 3.99: who cares? Your kind are a dime a dozen here. Go post in the "Chance Me" forum.

    I apologize if you feel I was bragging, but that's not the case. The reason that I asked is that having a 4.0 usually means that you got A's in all your classes. Thats not the case for me since my GPA is weighted and I wouldn't want to give anyone the wrong impression. Sorry if you were offended but it was an honest/innocent question- not an excuse to say something that I already know wouldn't impress anyone on this site.
  • ProxyGCProxyGC Posts: 247Registered User Junior Member
    What ever happened to significant digits in GPA calculations? Or to be specific, the notion that your average can't possibly be any more precise (carried out to more decimal places) than the grades that first went into its calculation? Any statisticians or scientists care to comment?
  • ucsd_ucla_daducsd_ucla_dad Posts: 8,573Registered User Senior Member
    If it's for a resume when the final grades aren't in yet then again, it seems that the GPA that's on the current transcript s/b used. Employers know that it could vary once final grades are in. Is there some reason not to just use the grades on the most recent transcript?
  • mafoolmafool Posts: 6,453Registered User Senior Member
    I don't know how many digits the university asigns to the grades. Is an A- computed as 3.750? I don't know.
«13
Sign In or Register to comment.