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Guaranteed Admission into Medical School

ksm221ksm221 Posts: 4Registered User New Member
edited November 2012 in Pre-Med Topics
I'm a senior in high school and currently applying to colleges. For some colleges, I am applying to the accelerated degree programs for Pre-Medicine. However, I don't think I have an amazing chance of getting into the programs because I didn't explore enough medical EC's and my SAT scores fall behind by about 20 points. So, now most probably I will do the traditional route in whichever university I attend. I really don't want to make the same mistake I did in high school so... What are things I can do that will almost guarantee acceptance into medical school? Unlike I mistakenly did in high school, I want to strive for medical school as soon as I start my undergrad career. I'm planning to major in BME and then go into med school. I know I have to maintain a high GPA and get an awesome MCAT score. But what else will make me undoubtedly a competitive candidate for med school? Thank you.
Post edited by ksm221 on

Replies to: Guaranteed Admission into Medical School

  • WayOutWestMomWayOutWestMom Posts: 6,097Registered User Senior Member
    What are things I can do that will almost guarantee acceptance into medical school?

    Unfortunately there is nothing you can do that will "almost guarantee" your admission. The best you can do is improve your odds.

    In general, you should have all of the following:

    1) a high GPA and sGPA (3.6 or above) while taking at least 12 credits/semester

    2) a strong evenly balanced MCAT score with no subsection score below 8

    3) basic lab or clinical research experience

    4) community service (the more the better, esp. a long-term deep commitment to a single issue)

    5) clinical volunteering (at a hospital, free-standing clinic, nursing home, group home to demonstrate your committment to medicine)

    6) physician shadowing (to better understand what it is a physician does and how they interact with patients and other members of the medical staff)

    7) leadership positions in your ECs

    8) excellent oral and written communication skills

    9) excellent interpersonal skills

    10) a non-judgmental attitude towards others

    11) maturity together with a cultivated sense of personal humility (nothing turns interviewers off faster than an applicant that comes off as entitled, arrogant or a$$holish, or one that is "gaming the system")

    12) hobbies, interests and passions that lie outside of medicine (makes you a more interesting person/applicant)

    However, the truth is that you can have all these things and still not get accepted into medical school. Every year thousands of viable applicants are denied admission simply because there aren't enough seats available.

    Medicine is a very long haul. Good luck!
  • MiamiDAPMiamiDAP Posts: 12,858Registered User Senior Member
    " I know I have to maintain a high GPA and get an awesome MCAT score. "
    -Exactly!!! Not much more, just do what other pre-meds are doing, normal things, shadow, volunteer, Research. Do not neglect to enjoy college experience and focus on developing as a person. GPA/MCAT are key to the door. Got to prove yourself to be a social team player to get acepted, social skills are important and could be developed only by intracting with the VARIETY of people in various environments.
  • bookiemombookiemom Posts: 1,879Registered User Senior Member
    WayOutWestMom's advice is just excellent. I have one addition: cultivate your relationship with at least three professors because you need strong letters of recommendation for med school. Two need to be from science professors, so get to know some.

    Her advice to focus on one area of community service in depth is good. Find some cause of type of service you believe in and do lots of work in that area all through college. It helps if you volunteer in that area with some kind of patient because you need to submit the number of hours spent in direct patient contact as part of your application.

    Keep a folder with all the hours you volunteer, names and contact numbers of people you report to, etc. You need all that later.

    It's good that you are thinking about all this so early. There is no sure way to be a shoo-in for med school.
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