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Why Does It Take Longer To Become a Doctor Than a Vet?

all605all605 Posts: 108Registered User Junior Member
edited July 2007 in Pre-Med Topics
Hey everyone, I'm a new poster here and wanted to get your thoughts on something. I'm interested in pursuing veterinary medicine, and from my understanding the pre-vet and pre-med tracks are pretty much the same. Both vet school and med school last 4 years, but the difference seems to be that in vet school the first two years are intense studying and the last two are more hands on. Unless vets specilize, they usually don't intern (and if they do specialize, the internships seem to only be 1-2 years). So anyways, why do doctors have to do residency for so long (3-7 years to my understanding), and does med school only consist of studying and very little hands on until residency? Are vet school and med school of equal intensity? I don't plan on becoming a doctor, but I'm just curious.
Post edited by all605 on

Replies to: Why Does It Take Longer To Become a Doctor Than a Vet?

  • bluedevilmikebluedevilmike Posts: 11,964Registered User Senior Member
    the first two years are intense studying and the last two are more hands on
    True of medical school too.

    Doctors have more training because the stakes are higher, so it's more important to ensure that their practice is reliable and trustworthy.
  • all605all605 Posts: 108Registered User Junior Member
    That makes sense. Although, it seems like vets need to know more overall because they treat more than one species and don't focus on one "aspect" of their health (whereas doctors deal with pediatric health or gynecological health or whatever usually). Maybe I'm completely wrong though and I don't want to come of as bashing doctors or anything because I definitely have a lot of respect for them.
  • bluedevilmikebluedevilmike Posts: 11,964Registered User Senior Member
    It would not surprise me if the knowledge which a perfect vet had surpassed the knowledge which a perfect doctor had to have -- but the importance of the stakes means that the training takes longer.
  • stonecold23stonecold23 Posts: 1,595Registered User Senior Member
    why are vets so underpaid? according to salary.com they make like 60-70K a year
  • UCLAriUCLAri Posts: 14,728Super Moderator Senior Member
    Because people are not as willing to spend as much money on the health of a pet as they are on themselves.
  • all605all605 Posts: 108Registered User Junior Member
    Everybody in the animal care field is pretty much underpaid because, like people here have already said, people are less willing to spend on their pets than themselves. The one advantage vets do have though is not having to pay for high malpractice insurance.
  • bayarea24bayarea24 Posts: 91Registered User Junior Member
    The one advantage vets do have though is not having to pay for high malpractice insurance.

    We'll see how long this lasts the way the legal machine is going in this country. I'm waiting for the day when a pet owner sues for future earnings of their animal
  • bemyparaguaybemyparaguay Posts: 56Registered User Junior Member
    all605, when you say pre-vet and pre-med requirements are the same, you're correct in most cases, but make sure you check out the requirements for the vet schools you're interested in. Some will require nutrition, higher level bio classes, a certain minimum amount of humanities/social sciences classes, etc. The requirements vary with each school, so check out the ones you're most interested in.
  • all605all605 Posts: 108Registered User Junior Member
    ^ yeah I know. I've already looked into it. Thanks though.
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