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Score my essay :) I conscience a more powerful motivator than money fame or power?

comeatmeSATcomeatmeSAT Posts: 1Registered User New Member
The question “Is conscience a more powerful motivator than money, fame, or power?” suggests that morals stimulate actions better than selfish gains do. In other words, the powerful inner voice that tells us what is right and wrong can be more convicting than materialistic rewards. In my opinion, conscience is a more powerful driving force than money, fame, and power. Throughout literature and society, the evidence to support this claim is pervasive.
Consider the case of Mr. Sugihara, the Japanese ambassador to Lithuania, a country facing Nazi invasion during World War Two. Mr. Sugihara was ordered to stop issuing visas to Jews who were trying to escape. However, Mr. Sugihara felt compassion for the Jews and continued to sign passports. Mr. Sugihara was compelled to help the Jews, despite the fact that he would be risking his fame and career.
Another compelling example is in the movie “Saving Private Ryan”. A convoy of American troops marched by a family whose house had been burned down. After a hot debate among the soldiers, they decided to escort the family to safety. They did so knowing that they were acting against their general’s orders, and that they will face severe consequences for disobedience.
As a final vivid example, consider Matt, from the book Among the Hidden. In the society that Matt lives in, it is illegal for families to have three children, and Matt is a third-child himself. He is always running and hiding, until one day, a family takes him in, risking punishment for hiding for hiding a third-child. The family acted out of their moral values despite putting their own safety in danger.
Clearly, the examples above show that conscience drives more powerfully than do selfish motives. From Mr. Sugihara’s testimony, society can see that morals spark action better than greedy desires. The troops from “Saving Private Ryan” also show that our inner voice can overcome money, fame and power. There is, no doubt, that conscience is the better catalyst for action.
Post edited by comeatmeSAT on

Replies to: Score my essay :) I conscience a more powerful motivator than money fame or power?

  • 075014075014 Posts: 168Registered User Junior Member
    The question “Is conscience a more powerful motivator than money, fame, or power?” suggests a question doesn't suggest anything... It's a question after allthat morals stimulate actions better than selfish gains do. In other words, the powerful inner voice that tells us what is right and wrong can be more convicting You might want to say convincing (cogent is better) because convicting is "acknowledging as culpable" than materialistic rewards. In my opinion, they don't care about your opinionconscience is a more powerful driving force than money, fame, and power. Throughout literature and society, the evidence to support this claim is pervasive.
    Consider the case of Mr. Sugihara, the Japanese ambassador to Lithuania, a country facing Nazi invasion during World War Two. Mr. Sugihara was ordered to stop issuing visas to Jews who were trying to escape. However, Mr. Sugihara felt compassion for the Jews and continued to sign passports. Mr. Sugihara was compelled to help the Jews he felt compassion and then he was compelled... You could remove this redundant "Mr. Sugihara", despite the fact that he would be risking his fame and career.
    Another compelling You should check what v.compel meansexample is in the movie “Saving Private Ryan”. A convoy of American troops marched by a family whose house had been burned down. After a hot debate among the soldiers, they decided to escort the family to safety. They did so knowing that they were acting against their general’s orders, and that they will face severe consequences for disobedience. too much superficial
    As a final vivid example, consider Matt, from the book Among the Hidden v.consider implies a subordinate, I mean it sounds weird. In the society that Matt lives in, it is illegal for families to have three children, and Matt is a third-child himself. He is always running and hiding, until one day, a family takes him in, risking punishment for hiding for hiding a third-child???? too long for an idea that simple. The family acted out of their moral values despite putting their own safety in danger.
    Clearly, the examples above show that conscience drives more powerfully than do selfish motives. From Mr. Sugihara’s testimony, society can see that morals spark action better than greedy desires. The troops from “Saving Private Ryan” also show that our inner voice can overcome money, fame and power. There is, no doubt,too long and superflous that conscience is the better catalyst for action.


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    I don't know if CC recognizes bracket but my appreciation are between them. What I'm gonna say might debase the usefulness of reading my feedbacks but I'm an international.
    However I can tell you that your essay lacks profoundness, I mean your essay is much an apologia of courage than a reel answer to the prompt. the examples don't emphasize enough the dilemna between conscientiousness and avarice.
    Moreover the essay is rather short, as a result I don't think that it can deserve more than 7 out of 12.
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