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Reuters: How Asian test-prep companies swiftly exposed the brand-new SAT

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Replies to: Reuters: How Asian test-prep companies swiftly exposed the brand-new SAT

  • jgoggsjgoggs Registered User Posts: 230 Junior Member
    @123field -- the date given by @mmk2015 above is the same one I read. Apparently College Confidential now won't even allow test-takers to mention the form codes of the tests they take (?), but there was discussion of this test recycling on Reddit.
  • jym626jym626 Registered User Posts: 51,913 Senior Member
    How does Ga Tech know that the kid sitting in front of the computer on the skype call is really the kid applying for admission? Seems like he another way to cheat.
  • kidsandlizkidsandliz Registered User Posts: 5 New Member
    edited April 2016
    The problem that is not going to be over come by any system is that the cheating companies pay people to take these exams and are paid to memorize just a couple of questions, then write them down and turn them in to the company paying them. As a result they can assemble the test pretty quickly that way whether it is paper, computer...

    Even if you have one time tests, there is a limit to the number of questions you can have in the database as they need normed, etc. so that the scores can be comparable. There are not going to be an infinite number of questions out there as it takes time to validate each question. Yes you can arrange it so that you can't look at your neighbor and cheat but there is no practical way to create 5 million different versions of the test (or however many test takers there are taking this thing each year).
  • cheatersstopcheatersstop Registered User Posts: 1 New Member
    edited April 2016
    In complete agreement with some posts here!

    Cheating on the ACT is very, very widespread in Asia, particularly in Korea.

    http://www.gohackers.com/?c=sat/sat_info/act_qa&uid=391636

    In this post here, written in Korean several days prior to the 2016 April ACT exam, allegations are made by a student that certain academies were selling advance copies of the April ACT exam in Korea for $30,000!

    We are not just talking about a problem of recycling exams here, but of unscrupulous individuals obtaining actual copies of the exam days and weeks before the exam is even administered.

    Translation of the post into English:

    ACT는 더이상 공정한 시험이 아닙니다. The ACT is no longer a fair exam.

    오늘 어떤 학원 다니는 제 친구에게 들었습니다. I heard from a friend today who attended a certain academy

    3천만원에 9일 보는 시험 구입해서 그거만 돌리고 있다고 했고

    일부 저에게 보여줬습니다. that it obtained a copy of the ACT exam to be administered on the 9th (April) for $30,000 and was only making the students solve that particular exam, which she showed me a portion of.

    SAT도 시끌 하더니 ACT도? 이게 정상입니까? The SAT caused much chaos, and now the ACT? Is this normal?

    어디 시험장 학교에서 빼돌렸는지 몰라도. I don't know which test center or school this test was stolen from,

    완전 허무하네요 but this is completely absurd.

    이러다가 한국에서 ACT도 못보는거 아닌가요? At this rate, will we not be able to take the ACT in Korea anymore?

    ACT보러 딴나라 가야되나요? Do we have to go to another country to take the ACT?

    이따위로 더럽게 컨트롤되는게 뭔 시험이라고 With tests administered/controlled in such a despicable fashion, can we even call it a test?
  • marvin100marvin100 Registered User Posts: 9,014 Senior Member
    edited April 2016
    kidsandliz wrote:
    The problem that is not going to be over come by any system is that the cheating companies pay people to take these exams and are paid to memorize just a couple of questions, then write them down and turn them in to the company paying them. As a result they can assemble the test pretty quickly that way whether it is paper, computer...

    Even if you have one time tests, there is a limit to the number of questions you can have in the database as they need normed, etc. so that the scores can be comparable. There are not going to be an infinite number of questions out there as it takes time to validate each question. Yes you can arrange it so that you can't look at your neighbor and cheat but there is no practical way to create 5 million different versions of the test (or however many test takers there are taking this thing each year).

    Hmm. In fact, the problem can be solved by single-use tests, and the CB does have the funds to do so (profit of $100 million last year, on the record as spending about $1 million to produce each test). You won't need "5 million different versions," just a different version for each sitting. Once again, the solution is clear: stop recycling tests and release every test to the public after it is administered.
  • jgoggsjgoggs Registered User Posts: 230 Junior Member
    For those who are interested, Reuters has followed up with another article, this one about the reuse of compromised tests in the U.S.:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-college-sat-usa-idUSKCN0XH1PJ

  • gettingschooledgettingschooled Registered User Posts: 1,872 Senior Member
    It is disappointing that these stories don't seem to be reported on more widely. The media loves reporting about the increasing competitiveness of college admissions. This seems to dovetail nicely with those story lines. I don't think College Board will change its ways without wider coverage.

    I thought the quote "we listened, they listened" from the counselor in the article above was whether weak. Doesn't feel like the counselors are really holding CBs feet to the fire.
  • marvin100marvin100 Registered User Posts: 9,014 Senior Member
    I agree @gettingschooled to some degree, but as someone who's been ranting and raving about the perils of test recycling for about a decade, it's incredibly encouraging to hear that same talking point from someone who actually has the ear of the College Board, which has shown zero zero zero interest in listening to the rest of us. A small reason for hope, at least.
  • thetexthetex Registered User Posts: 234 Junior Member
    hahaha lmao this is hilarious what did you expect????
  • GMTplus7GMTplus7 Registered User Posts: 14,567 Senior Member
    edited May 2016
    I have a suggestion-- something easier to implement compared to other proposed solutions for controlling cheating.

    Make the essay section MANDATORY instead of optional. Use the essay as a QC. Rather than create a whole new test, just create several dozen essay prompts for each test sitting-- so not everyone gets the same essay on test day. For the high scorers, check for whether there is a huge inconsistency in live essay writing ability vs "perfect" CR/Verbal scores.

    Since not everyone will get the same essay, don't report the essay score. Just use the essay as a writing sample to check the student's ability.



  • marvin100marvin100 Registered User Posts: 9,014 Senior Member
    I'm not sure that's a viable plan, @GMTplus7 -- the skills on the essay don't have much overlap with the skills in R or W MCQ sections. (Even more importan: the essay is the most game-able part of the test. Yes, even the new essay can be beaten with a well-made formula.)
  • ivysourceivysource Registered User Posts: 159 Junior Member
    edited May 2016
    I expect that someday soon the SAT will be a CAT (computer adaptive test) like the GMAT or the GRE. It's very, very hard to cheat on an adaptive computer exam.
This discussion has been closed.