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How do they score the SAT math section

sns3242sns3242 Registered User Posts: 25 New Member
I know that depending on the specific SAT, college board grades the test differently. But in general about how many points will you drop for a perfect score if you miss one problem?

Replies to: How do they score the SAT math section

  • DiotimaDMDiotimaDM Registered User Posts: 696 Member
    In general, 20 points. Sometimes missing one is still a perfect score, but the average is around 20 points.
  • masquerade98masquerade98 Registered User Posts: 355 Member
    The curve varies from test to test. Generally, it's a bit more lenient than the old SAT, so you can expect to drop around 10 points per problem I believe. I could be wrong though.
  • kjake2000kjake2000 Registered User Posts: 752 Member
  • DartMonkey93DartMonkey93 Registered User Posts: 50 Junior Member
    This is what I noticed about the official practice tests:
    PT1/2/3/6: 1 incorrect answer means 790, and 2 incorrect answers mean 780
    PT5/7: 1 incorrect answer means 790, and 2 incorrect answers mean 770
    PT4: 1 incorrect answer still means 800, and 2 or 3 incorrect answers mean 790

    Generally, you would drop 10 points if you got a raw score of 57/58.

    I am unsure whether I am allowed to discuss my score and number of incorrect answers, though.
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