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Can someone take the sat and act scores if they are in slow learning support classes ?

MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
Can someone take the sat and act scores if they are in slow learning support classes?

Replies to: Can someone take the sat and act scores if they are in slow learning support classes ?

  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 827 Member
    Yes, and they can get testing accommodations like untimed tests, only person in the room, etc. And this doesn't have to be disclosed to colleges as they can't discriminate on disabilities per the ADA.
  • BuckeyeMWDSGBuckeyeMWDSG Registered User Posts: 352 Member
    I had a relative that even had a 'reader' available to her whose job it was to read out loud anything on the test to her.
    https://www.act.org/content/dam/act/unsecured/documents/ACT-TestAccommodationsChart.pdf
  • MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    @BuckeyeMWDSG @theloniusmonk Is the act test and the sat test easy for someone to take if he or she is in slow learning support class ?
  • theloniusmonktheloniusmonk Registered User Posts: 827 Member
    Well the tests aren't easy for people that don't need learning support, that's why you see all the test prep that happens, even for those you would consider very good students. That's why you see people taking the test so many times and spend entire summers studying for the them. However you don't want to put this amount of stress on students in learning support or are LD. There's no way to generalize how hard it will be or what sections will be harder since each student is different. The only clue you may have is if the student took any state based standardized tests earlier in middle or elementary school. If the tests are too hard then you can consider test optional schools, also the colleges would need to provide support once admitted if the student has any kind of disability that's been officially documented (IEP, 504 etc.).
  • MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    Ok can a slow learner get into college without the sat and the act scores ? @thelonliestmonk
  • nw2thisnw2this Registered User Posts: 2,322 Senior Member
    0n the least expensive end, community colleges do not require scores. On the more expensive end, Landmark College and Beacon College are colleges especially for students who need learning support and they don't require scores. There also are other test optional colleges and some offer learning support like University of Arizona.
  • MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    Ok thank you @nw2this
  • MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    Hey guys should I take them or no ?
  • nw2thisnw2this Registered User Posts: 2,322 Senior Member
    Where do you want to go to school?
  • MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    I want to go to pennstate it don't matter where I go to school at I don't know should I take the sat and the act because I am in a slow learning support class . @nw2this
  • AroundHereAroundHere Registered User Posts: 2,227 Senior Member
    You should talk to your guidance counselor. Depending on why you are in slow learning support class, you may qualify for a special testing situation which would make it easier for you. The paperwork for that takes time to process and you wouldn't want to sign up for the test without it.

    Also, each student with an IEP is entitled to a post high school transition plan. You can discuss why college may or may not be the right path for you there.
  • MichaelRobinsonMichaelRobinson Registered User Posts: 68 Junior Member
    Ok thank you and I will talk to the testing center to about my question and issues @AroundHere .
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