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Is "none" singular or plural on the SAT?

YourMasterYourMaster Posts: 229- Junior Member
edited July 2006 in SAT Preparation
if it is singular, is it still singular in this phrase? "none of the cars"
any dictionary will state that it can be either singular or plural. however, sat practice exams seem to regard it as singular always.
Post edited by YourMaster on

Replies to: Is "none" singular or plural on the SAT?

  • ManUtd20OleManUtd20Ole Posts: 1,246Registered User Senior Member
    It's singular.
  • ru4real1666ru4real1666 Posts: 349Registered User Member
    None of the documents (is/are) identified in the brief.
    Think: Not one of the documents is identified in the brief. (singular subject/singular verb)


    usually singular on SAT, technically both and defined as both
  • jimbob1225jimbob1225 Posts: 3,457Registered User Senior Member
    none is always singular
    as is either and neither

    "neither of them is going to the party" is correct, "none of the teachers is friendly" is also correct.
  • bigmrpigbigmrpig Posts: 288Registered User Junior Member
    It works as the opposite of "all" and follows the same grammar rules. All of the food is gone. None of the food is gone. All of the eggs are gone. None of the eggs are gone. That's also what I've always been taught in school, and it's what the grammar books say. I'm not actually even sure where one would get the idea that it's singular.

    I don't know what all these people saying it's always singular are talking about.

    Here are some pages about it:
    http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-non2.htm
    http://www.grammarmudge.cityslide.com/articles/article/1026513/9903.htm
    http://www.englishrules.com/writing/2005/none-singular-or-plural.php
    http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/g11.html

    The first two are long explanations, the third one quotes a grammar book, and the last one is dictionary.com's explanation. I've yet to even find someone other than the posters here claim that it is always singular.

    None of the people saying that it's always singular _are_ correct.
  • anonymous271828anonymous271828 Posts: 89Registered User Junior Member
    jimbob1225 wrote:
    none is always singular
    as is either and neither

    "neither of them is going to the party" is correct, "none of the teachers is friendly" is also correct.


    hardy har har
    WORDS THAT ARE EITHER SINGULAR OR PLURAL SUBJECT:
    • When the parts of a compound subject are joined by
      or, but, either ... or, neither ... nor, not only ... but also
      the verb must agree with the subject nearest to the verb.
      • Neither the Oregon players nor the coach was overconfident.
      • Neither the Oregon coach nor the players were intimidated by Arizona.
    • Collective nouns and certain plural words may take singular or plural verbs-depending on the meaning in the sentence.

      TEST: If the word indicates persons or things working together as an identifiable unit, a singular verb is used.
      • The jury was seated at 9 a.m. ("It" was seated.)
      • BUT: The jury were being interviewed by the media.
        (refers to individual members of the jury; could be rewritten as: "The jurors were ... ")
      • Politics is a hot topic. (politics as a single topic)
      • BUT: The mayor's politics are offensive. (politics as several actions over time)
    • The pronouns any, none or some and the nouns all and most:
      • take singular verbs when they refer to a unit or quantity.
        • Some of the money was missing. (a bag of money)
      • take plural verbs when they refer to number, amount or individuals.
        • Some of the gold coins were missing. (a series of coins)
    • "NONE":
      • "No Single One"; "Not One"--Singular
        • None of the gold coins was missing. (not one of the coins)
      • "No Two" or "No Amount"--Plural
        • None of the goods were missing. (no amount of the goods)
        • None of the forests were destroyed. (no amount of the forests)
  • jimbob1225jimbob1225 Posts: 3,457Registered User Senior Member
    yeah in english class we learned that "neither jane nor the boys were going to the party"

    but thanks for reminding me of that and pointing out my error!
  • DUDEDUDE Posts: 93. Junior Member
    none is always singular
    as is either and neither

    "neither of them is going to the party" is correct, "none of the teachers is friendly" is also correct.

    LMAO!!...W.T.F?
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