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Post Writing Questions Here

silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
edited December 2013 in SAT Preparation
I've noticed that there are many threads posing SAT Writing questions. It may be more helpful if we consolidate further posts on the topic into one thread.

Feel free to post any Writing questions that you have. Be sure to include the answer choice if you have the key, and I or another informed poster will attempt to explain why the answer is what it is and may also communicate a more generally applicable rule that will help in answering similar questions.

If you post error-identification questions, enclose the potential answer choices in parentheses for ease of reading.

(About me: I'm currently a junior in high school, but I scored a perfect on the MC choice portion of the SAT Writing section two years ago.)
Post edited by silverturtle on
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Replies to: Post Writing Questions Here

  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    From Rh.,

    Conflicts between land developers and conservationists have repeatedly arose (A) , causing congress to reconsider legislation that prohibits building within habitats of endangered species.

    Answer is (A) because the auxiliary word "have" precedes the past perfect tense, which is "arisen" in this case.
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    From theReach,

    Peter's [seemingly effortless] flights, [achieved through] the use of sophisticated technical equipment, [continues] to delight those [who] see the play Peter Pan.

    The answer is (C) because "continues" must agree with the plural "flights."
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    From theReach,

    Mediators were standing by, prepared [to intervene] in the labor dispute [even though] both sides [had refused] earlier offers [for] assistance.

    "offers for assistance" is presumably unidiomatic, and the answer is therefore (D).
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    From theReach,

    An amateur potter [herself], the accountant offered [to help] the artist with his business accounts, complicated [as they were] [by] his unusual system of record keeping.

    The original poster of this question claims the erroneous word to be "by," and I am forced to conclude that the use of "by" in this context is colloquial or unidiomatic.
  • lockdown22lockdown22 Posts: 297Registered User Junior Member
    Here's one, it was the only one I missed but I just don't understand the error:

    There is probably no story more dramatic than baseball's great hitter and right fielder, Hank Aaron.

    The answer is D (than baseball's).
  • RAlec114RAlec114 Posts: 2,644- Senior Member
    @ #4, is "offer to" the correct idiomatic phrase?
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    From lockdown22,

    (There is) (probably no) story (more dramatic) (than baseball's) great hitter and right fielder, Hank Aaron.

    The answer is (D) because there is an illogical comparison. A story should be compared only to another story. The sentence should be: "There is probably no story more dramatic than that of baseball's great hitter and right fielder, Hank Aaron."
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    "is 'offer to' the correct idiomatic phrase?"

    Yes, the sentence should end with "earlier offers to assist."
  • lockdown22lockdown22 Posts: 297Registered User Junior Member
    The answer is (D) because there is an illogical comparison. A story should be compared only to another story. The sentence should be: "There is probably no story more dramatic than that of baseball's great hitter and right fielder, Hank Aaron."

    Ah, that makes sense. Thanks.
  • theReachtheReach Posts: 1,653Registered User Member
    Just an update to my question about the potter problem (Writing). By was the answer I chose, not the correct answer. The correct answer is No Error.
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    From theReach (Corrected),

    An amateur potter [herself], the accountant offered [to help] the artist with his business accounts, complicated [as they were] [by] his unusual system of record keeping.

    The original poster of this question claims the erroneous word to be "by," and I am forced to conclude that the use of "by" in this context is colloquial or unidiomatic.

    UPDATED: It turns out there was a miscommunication. "by" is apparently not colloquial as deemed by whoever wrote this question; there is no error.
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    (I found this to be a rather interesting question, as the error in parallelism is rather subtle.)

    From iLee,

    The revote against Victorianism was perhaps even more marked in poetry than EITHER FICTION OR DRAMA.
    1 the same
    2 either in fiction or drama
    3 in either fiction or drama

    There is an error because "in poetry" must be parallel to "either fiction or drama." This logic, however, merely rules out choice (1). One distinguishes between choices (2) and (3) by correctly applying the idiom: "more in... than in either."
  • cadillaccadillac Posts: 886Registered User Member
    Just a general question about unsual idioms... not about the ones followed by prepositions, but the ones that start introductory such as "heretofore..." or "As while..." I encountered one on my last SAT test, and it was just so awkward (it was like 2 of those words together) that I marked it wrong.

    Would it be safer to assume that those weird phrases are normally correct? (I hope my question makes sense)
  • silverturtlesilverturtle Posts: 12,496Registered User Senior Member
    I'm not comfortable making any generalization of that kind with confidence.
  • RAlec114RAlec114 Posts: 2,644- Senior Member
    can someone get me a list of correct and commonly misused idioms?
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