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Taking Real Analysis & Abstract Algebra at the same time?

CalDudCalDud Posts: 1,621Registered User Senior Member
edited April 2013 in Science Majors
Well, I'm taking my intro to proofs class right now. It's not that bad so far. Anyways, we have to register for Fall Quarter and I'm wondering if I should take these two classes together.

These are basically my two schedules for the next school year (my idea anyway). Would it be difficult to handle both Abstract Algebra & Real Analysis at the beginning of the year?

Schedule 1

F13
Abstract Algebra
Real Analysis
Astrophysics
Numerical Methods

W14
Abstract Algebra II
Real Analysis II
Space Physics
Applied Probability Theory

SP14
Complex Variables
Applied Statistics
Relativity, Gravity, Black Holes


OR

SCHEDULE II

F13
Real Analysis
Astrophysics
Numerical Methods
Applied Probability Theory

W14
Abstract Algebra
Real Analysis II
Applied Statistics
Space Physics

SP14
Abstract Algebra II
Complex Variables
Relativity, Gravity, Black Holes
Post edited by CalDud on

Replies to: Taking Real Analysis & Abstract Algebra at the same time?

  • Bounce007Bounce007 Posts: 47Registered User Junior Member
    Is there anyway you can avoid taking Abstract Algebra and Real Analysis at the same time??? It can be done, but those 2 classes demand plenty of time. Personally I would avoid taking them at the same time. When I was in undergrad, I took Abstract Algebra before I took Real Anlysis (they weren't broken up into 2 courses). I found that Abstract Algebra helped me prepare for real analysis where proof writing is concerned. Sorry I can't help more. Good luck.
  • CalDudCalDud Posts: 1,621Registered User Senior Member
    I've read people traditionally take Abstract Algebra before Real Analysis. They only offer Real Analysis I in the fall unfortunately, so I have to take that. I could either take Abstract Algebra winter quarter or take it fall quarter. But inevitably it's either I take part I and II together or take part I of Abstract Algebra and part II of Real Analysis winter quarter.

    I know that two great professors are teaching those subjects for the fall.

    Would it just be easier to go with my second schedule, you think?
  • Bounce007Bounce007 Posts: 47Registered User Junior Member
    Schedule 2 seems more manageable. You could be at a disadvantage as some techniques learned in Abstract Algebra could serve you well in real analysis. Optimally it would be best to take Abstract Algebra before Real Analysis but since you can't.... I would say schedule 2. I would love to hear the views of others.
  • GLOBALTRAVELERGLOBALTRAVELER Posts: 2,856Registered User Senior Member
    Well....

    For many math majors who take the "pure math" route, usually Analysis/Real Analysis I, Analysis/Real Analysis II, Abstract Algebra I and Abstract Algebra II are ALL required, so I would imagine that some pure math majors would take them during the same semester.

    Having said that, I would take "Schedule II" because don't sleep on that Probability Theory course with the proofs. I cannot say that I had a Probability Theory course by course title, but I had a graduate course in Stochastic Processes and the book we used (as I glance at my bookshelf) was "Probability Models" by Ross.
  • Bounce007Bounce007 Posts: 47Registered User Junior Member
    Global Traveler... what was your graduate degree in, if you don't mind me asking here.
  • GLOBALTRAVELERGLOBALTRAVELER Posts: 2,856Registered User Senior Member
    Global Traveler... what was your graduate degree in, if you don't mind me asking here.

    M.S. in Engineering (no specialization) at U-Wisconsin. Here were my courses:
    - Advanced Probability & Statistics (graduate course, calculus-based)
    - Linear Algebra (graduate course but very little theory)
    - Project Management I
    - Project Management II
    - Advanced Quality Management
    - Advanced Experimental Design
    - Taguchi Methods
    - Statistical Quality Control
    - Data Warehousing & Data Mining
    - Systems Engineering

    Now the above were the 10 courses/30 credits for the M.S. Engineering degree. To be honest, I just wanted a graduate engineering degree and took a "path of least resistance"...basically took as many mathematics/statistics courses as I could. Federal government contracting really cares that you HAVE a M.S./M.Eng degree for hour billing purposes....and that was all I cared about. :-)

    About 3 years later, while working for Boeing and in preparation for a new contract, took graduate courses in Stochastic Processes and Linear Optimization.

    Now I do not recommend the following statement because one needs to know how hiring is done in their niche industry...but depending on who I send the resume to, my resume MAY say "M.S. Engineering" or it may say "M.S. Systems Engineering"...depending how I feel, LOL!!
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Posts: 36,773Registered User Senior Member
    If you like proofs and are good at them, then doing both real analysis and abstract algebra may not be too bad. However, these courses are usually seen as the hardest of undergraduate proof-oriented math courses, so approach with caution if you are not a top student in math by math major standards.
  • Bounce007Bounce007 Posts: 47Registered User Junior Member
    Thanks Global!

    So to stay on track with the OP's question - Schedule 2 seems like the more manageable route. But as Ucbalumnus said, if you plan on going with Route 1 "doing both real analysis and abstract algebra may not be too bad... so approach with caution if you are not a top student in math by math major standards"
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