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Lowest SAT score you know that got accepted into Stanford...

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Replies to: Lowest SAT score you know that got accepted into Stanford...

  • girldreamergirldreamer Posts: 16Registered User New Member
    what were other qualifications?
  • girldreamergirldreamer Posts: 16Registered User New Member
    WOW that is great!
  • sicknicksicknick Posts: 5Registered User New Member
    Hi, I'm an international student and I intend to enroll in a US college next year. I really want to get into Stanford...but I think my chances are slim because of my low grades and low SAT score (3.6 unweighted GPA...1750 SAT)...however throughout my high school life I've been involved in countless clubs, been the President of a few and founded 2...I've also been involved in research, currently working (since the summer), and now own a business...what are my chances really?
  • ccdaddioccdaddio Posts: 191- Junior Member
    @sicknick

    you should check out the Stanford Common Data set to get a sense.

    Scores aren't everything, but about 95% of the class has a GPA greater than 3.75 unweighted. Also about 86% had an ACT score of 30+ (equivalent to a SAT score of 2000).
  • Data10Data10 Posts: 1,143Registered User Senior Member
    Scores aren't everything, but about 95% of the class has a GPA greater than 3.75 unweighted.
    Are you sure that it's unweighted? The common data set specifies that average GPA is weighted, listing it as "4.18 weighted." This fits with other selective universities having a substantially higher percentage with a below 3.75 GPA. For example, Princeton has a reputation as focusing more on scores than Stanford, yet the CDS mentions that Princeton has ~3x as many students below 3.75 as Stanford. Princeton's CDS GPA does not say "weighted", explaining the large difference. Also note that 16% of the entering class did not submit GPA, which can distort the stats.
  • ccdaddioccdaddio Posts: 191- Junior Member
    @data10

    From the latest common data set...
    Percentage of all enrolled, degree-seeking, first-time, first-year (freshman) students who had high school grade-point averages within each of the following ranges (using 4.0 scale).

    So I am not sure how open that is to interpretation. If it is a 4.0 scale, does that mean unweighted? Seems if it is a 4.0 scale, you can't have a 4.18. Unless it is like Spinal Tap - where you can get to 11 on a 1-10 scale.

    Lastly, since they mention in the next question, as you noted, that the average GPA is 4.18 weighted, it would seem that not mentioning weighted in the previous question implies unweighted, along with the 4.0 scale.

    I have heard from someone that a while ago they look at unweighted grades, then took that into account based on the level of difficulty (e.g. number of honors and APs) since many people calculated the weightings differently.


    BTW, how do people not submit GPA? Is that an international thing or do that many schools not have a GPA ?
  • oldmom4896oldmom4896 Posts: 2,284Registered User Senior Member
    From the Stanford common data set, there were students (not many but some) admitted in 2011-12 with scores of 400-499 in various sections of the SAT.
    Stanford University: Common Data Set 2011-2012
    section c9.
  • ccdaddioccdaddio Posts: 191- Junior Member
    BTW #2, odd about the number of people submitting GPAs is what seems to be low at 84%


    Princeton: has 96% submitting GPA
    Harvard: 99.76%

    curious why the Stanford number is so low.
  • Data10Data10 Posts: 1,143Registered User Senior Member
    So I am not sure how open that is to interpretation. If it is a 4.0 scale, does that mean unweighted? Seems if it is a 4.0 scale, you can't have a 4.18. .
    A 4.0 scale can indicate a regular A = 4.0, B = 3.0, C = 2.0,... rather than 4.0 is the maximum possible GPA. I knew a guy at Stanford who graduated with close to a 4.18 (won an award for the highest GPA among all engineering majors in my class). Stanford's grading scale is listed at How the General University GPA is Determined | Student Affairs . I doubt that Stanford grads filling out employee applications that ask for GPA on a 4.0 scale would convert their GPA from what the school provides, even though it is possible to get above a 4.0. Similarly some HSs say their weighted GPA is on a 4.0 scale even though it is possible to have a GPA above 4.0. An example is the "4.0 weighted GPA scale" described at http://www.nicolet.k12.wi.us/cms_files/resources/GPA%20scales%20current%20and%20proposed.pdf .
    Lastly, since they mention in the next question, as you noted, that the average GPA is 4.18 weighted, it would seem that not mentioning weighted in the previous question implies unweighted, along with the 4.0 scale.
    Question C11 lists percentages. It is not appropriate or meaningful to state "94.84% weighted", like it would be to say an average GPA of "4.18 weighted".
  • SinajSinaj Posts: 47Registered User Junior Member
    It really is all a guessing game. My son graduated Stanford last June (was in at Early Action) and my daughter just got accepted in Regular decision after being deferred in Early Action. As students they were quite different...Son gpa 3.7ish daughter 4.9. Son - maybe 3 AP classes, daughter 10 all with A's! Son, some EC's with nothing too impressive, daughter - off the chart EC's including nat'l awards in writing, plays, and scripts. Both had ethnic hook and just slightly above average test scores. I would have thought they would have snagged daughter at first glance and son would have been the one deferred but it was the other way around. Son was Class of 13 and daughter Class of 18. When son applied there were about 26K freshmen applicants, this year 42K.
  • MartinnMartinn Posts: 4Registered User New Member
    I got into Stanford and 3 other equally competitive schools with a 1940 SAT, which by the looks of it after reading through this thread is relatively low. However, I did a lot that I'm guessing balanced this score out: a GPA of 4.7, 12 AP classes throughout high school, 5 additional courses at my local community college, every academic and volunteer based school club/organization, and sports year round all while coming from a low economic first generation college student background.

    I'm not sure how admissions officers look at scores and stuff compared to the area one comes from, but that might have been a factor.The average SAT score for my school district is something like 1400.

    So SAT scores aren't THE deciding factor.
  • MigotoMigoto Posts: 36Registered User Junior Member
    I know a you-tuber that got into Stanford w/ a 1400 something. I know what you are think but she is an AMAZING poetic writer.
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