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If I am denied at Early Action, can I still apply for Regular Decision?

chumpchangechumpchange Posts: 35Registered User Junior Member
edited October 2009 in Stanford University
If I apply early action to Stanford and am rejected, will I automatically be entered into the regular decision pool? Can I still apply for regular decision?
Post edited by chumpchange on
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Replies to: If I am denied at Early Action, can I still apply for Regular Decision?

  • lifegrlifegr Posts: 1,147Registered User Senior Member
    Noooooooooooooooooooooooooop
    sucks, right?
  • mamaemamae Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    No, if you are rejected EA you will no longer be considered for admission, and there is no appeal from what I understand. However, if you are deferred EA you will be considered with the RD pool.
  • chumpchangechumpchange Posts: 35Registered User Junior Member
    Does anyone know the percent of EAs accepted, deferred, and rejected?
  • mamaemamae Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    I don't have the exact numbers, but I know the percentage of Stanford '13 RDs accepted was less than 8 percent and the percentage of EAs accepted was a bit higher, but the common wisdom seems to be that the EA pool is wildly competitive (not to take away from the fact that the RD pool is also amazing), and Stanford seems to prefer to keep a shorter deferred list than Yale, for example, meaning that even highly qualified candidates may be rejected rather than deferred EA.
  • chumpchangechumpchange Posts: 35Registered User Junior Member
    Hmmm, ok. Do you think I should EA or RD?

    Just to put things in perspective, on paper as far as numbers go, I look pretty good on paper: 2330 SAT I, 4.5+ GPA, and rank 1. However, my weakness is my personal statement:trying not to be trite and making the essay flow well.
  • mamaemamae Posts: 157Registered User Junior Member
    You look great on paper. I wish I could tell you what to do, but there is no way to predict with any certainty whether you will have a better outcome through EA or RD. I would suggest looking through the list of Stanford applicants who posted their results after applying EA last year. I believe applicants with hooks seem to fare the best through EA, and perhaps unhooked applicants get a longer look during RD, but not everyone believes that; it's just the opinion I have formulated based on the "snapshot" this forum provides. Whatever you decide, I wish you all the best!
  • Tiger62025Tiger62025 Posts: 19Registered User New Member
    I application will see yours in the EA pool! I do not look anywhere near as great as you look on paper. However, I have killer essays plus a 'hook' that will hopefully get me noticed. As I understand it, there is a much larger percentage of applicants who are accepted in EA than in RD, but it may be correct that the EA pool is much more competitive than RD.

    The way I see it, admissions---whether EA or RD---are always competitive at Stanford. Most of the pool will have numbers like yours. Good luck to you!
  • chumpchangechumpchange Posts: 35Registered User Junior Member
    Good idea! Thank you very much for all your help, mamae.
  • pingpong2010pingpong2010 Posts: 16Registered User New Member
    Sorry for my ignorance, but what are you guys talking about with these "hooks"? The only hook-related aspect of college admissions I can think of would be a hook in an admissions essay, meaning the essay is interesting or ends well or whatever- is that it?
  • whoanesswhoaness Posts: 392Registered User Member
    @pingpong2010- A hook is like the fact that a person is a minority, first generation, concert pianist, or published author etc. For school's like Stanford you more or less need one because the majority of applicants have pretty good profiles (great credentials academically and otherwise)

    @chumpchange- here's how the numbers work out:

    According to Stanford's website - Overall: 30,428 7.9%
    Another site said that the SCEA acceptance rate was 16.1%

    If these numbers are correct, we can assume that a higher percentage of EAs get admitted than RDs. Also, from what I hear a fewer number of people apply SCEA ... so really in the end it makes no difference. It just comes down to how amazing you are to the peeps at stanford. If you feel that you're a competitive applicant (not necessarily a shoo-in, but at least note worthy) then it really comes down to whether Stanford is your first choice or not. If you have no desire to apply early anywhere else, then I would go for it. But also keep in mind that EA is not like ED... you can also apply to your other schools RD if you want to (don't have to worry about feeling blocked in).
    hope that helps.
  • StarmieStarmie Posts: 306Registered User Member
    The REA rate isn't quite that high: 12.8%, compared to 6.4% for RD. Still a big difference, still not so big when you consider the relative strength of the applicant pool.
  • pingpong2010pingpong2010 Posts: 16Registered User New Member
    @whoaness- thanks for the info about hooks. Does being Asian count as a minority? From what I've heard, Asian isn't a minority at Stanford. But it isn't Caucasian, right? And actually, I'm half Asian, half Caucasian- will that make me minority?
  • BigMike3541BigMike3541 Posts: 319Registered User Member
    no you are not a minority, lol
  • whoanesswhoaness Posts: 392Registered User Member
    haha. when they say minority they mean underrepresented minorities. And unfortunately if you're Indian, Chinese, or White you aren't exactly a URM.
  • BigMike3541BigMike3541 Posts: 319Registered User Member
    It's so hilarious to me that everyone wants to be as white as possible all the time and then wants to be a minority long enough to fill out college apps
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