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Why American Students Are Flocking to Germany

Roger_DooleyRoger_Dooley Founder Posts: 106,392 Senior Member
NBC News reports that the number of American students studying in Germany is rising quickly, in part due to much lower tuitions.

"More than 10,000 U.S. students are presently enrolled in the country's higher education programs, according to data from the Institute for International Education. It's an increase of almost 9 percent compared to the previous academic year, and 25 percent more than in 2008-2009...

Minnesotan Sarah Johnson, also a University of Bonn master's student, has a total monthly expenditure of $600 in Germany — or $7,200 per year. That compares to $20-30,000 dollars in tuition fees alone she would have paid back home."

http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/college-game-plan/why-american-students-are-flocking-germany-staying-n515961

The article describes it as a win-win situation, though I wonder if at some point the German government might start limiting its subsidies of foreign nationals.
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Replies to: Why American Students Are Flocking to Germany

  • SouthFloridaMom9SouthFloridaMom9 Registered User Posts: 3,260 Senior Member
    I would do it in a minute if I were a young adult! Germany is wonderful, and accessible to many place in Europe.
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 1,513 Senior Member
    I agree. And paying to educate Americans may be better for Germany than accepting more refugees.
  • oldUVAgradoldUVAgrad Registered User Posts: 360 Member
    My son is graduating this year, read this article and now wants to apply to grad school at the University of Bonn. I am curious about the living arrangements. He said he talked to a friend of a friend who said living with an older couple is not an uncommon way to manage living expenses. I hope people with more knowledge and experience add their expertise to this thread!
  • fractalmstrfractalmstr Registered User Posts: 2,107 Senior Member
    European universities are too minimalist for me. Fewer frills, smaller support infrastructure, and the vast majority of students live off campus in normal apartments.

    The low cost sounds great until you realize you get what you pay for -- an education, and that's about it. To each his own though!
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 61,574 Senior Member
    edited February 2016
    European universities are too minimalist for me. Fewer frills, smaller support infrastructure, and the vast majority of students live off campus in normal apartments.

    The low cost sounds great until you realize you get what you pay for -- an education, and that's about it. To each his own though!

    Isn't that similar to lots of moderately and less selective universities and community colleges where most US college students go to college? Or perhaps like the state flagships a century ago, when they had few or no dorms, so students moving to the area to attend school lived in other housing in the area. Or like graduate and professional school students today, who are more likely to living in non-school-run housing in the area than undergraduate students.
  • insanedreamerinsanedreamer Registered User Posts: 1,536 Senior Member
    edited February 2016
    It's a good option - my D initially was quite set on going there as she had spent a summer in Germany an loved it. There aren't that many undergraduate programs offered entirely in English so German proficiency is required. (Though we did find one smaller university with all English programs.) In the end, she got a nearly full scholarship to a top US engineering school so went there, and might go to masters or pHd program in Germany instead (which has many more options in English), TUM or Berlin would be great. (Personally, I'm hoping she'll go to Zurich.)
  • NoVADad99NoVADad99 Registered User Posts: 2,291 Senior Member
    My son is studying German (3rd year, AP German next year) and is going on an exchange there this summer. I wish he would consider a German school. I think it's a wonderful opportunity and could lead to some very interesting career options later on.
  • saillakeeriesaillakeerie Registered User Posts: 1,513 Senior Member
    Maybe spending time in Germany this summer will be the spark to ignite an interest in studying there.
  • myjandamyjanda Registered User Posts: 582 Member
    To reiterate what Dietz199 said - German students often have had 13 years of school under their belts before heading to University and they go directly into their majors. So you better be really sure you know what you want to major in first as you won't get much opportunity to sample other subjects. German kids are encouraged to figure out their career paths early in high school, if not sooner and switching majors is less common than here. Some majors, such as art, film etc may require studying at a Fachochschule rather than a university. These are more like technical colleges.

    We figured out that the scholarship my daughter was getting at her US university made it roughly the same cost to go to school in the US as in Germany, where she'd have to pay for room and board as an extra plus flying home periodically.
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