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non-major tech crew

RunsWScissorsRunsWScissors Posts: 441Registered User Member
edited November 2012 in Theater/Drama Majors
My son had for some time considered majoring in technical theater, but eventually decided to go for engineering. He has been very active in tech crew in HS and would love to continue in college, even in a volunteer position if he attends a school with a theater program. It is the activity that he said he will have the hardest time giving up. Is this something that is even possible? Thanks
Post edited by RunsWScissors on

Replies to: non-major tech crew

  • gibbygibby Posts: 6,075Registered User Senior Member
    Most colleges (even those that don't offer a theater major) have theater as an extracurricular activity -- and every production needs a good tech crew. It actually might be easier for your son to work crew at a school that doesn't offer a theater major, as those that do, might also have students majoring in technical theater. Your son should google theater groups at the schools he has applied to and see what plays are currently in production.
  • KatMTKatMT Posts: 3,422College Rep Senior Member
    Yes, depending on the school.
  • TheRealKEVPTheRealKEVP Posts: 986- Member
    I know different colleges and unis have different ways of handling this.

    But when I was directing shows as an undergrad, I would never had said "no" to somebody showing up and saying "Hey, can I volunteer to be on the tech crew of your show?" I always could have used an extra pair of hands.

    But apparently some colleges and unis have rules against this, or something.

    If he really loves theatre tech so much, and will have the hardest time giving it up, why isn't he majoring in theatre tech? You may have heard that theatre grads have a real hard time finding work, but that just refers to the acting majors. I have heard that theatre tech folks have a much easier time finding work.

    KEVP
  • NJTheatreMOMNJTheatreMOM Posts: 2,887Registered User Senior Member
    Although extra pairs of hands are always needed for tech crew, I would imagine that the most creative, design-oriented technical work would be reserved for the students in the design and production major of a theatre program.

    A school that has a performance-oriented major but no design and production major (and perhaps relatively few tech courses) -- but which at the same time does many shows with high production values -- would probably be the best choice. You'd really have to investigate all of the potential programs very carefully to find this.
  • RunsWScissorsRunsWScissors Posts: 441Registered User Member
    Thank you for the replies. I think he will be reassured and I will pass the info to him so he can do a little research. I really thought he was going to choose this as a career, I was even looking into summer programs so he could build a resume and make sure this the right thing for him, but he made the decision on his own, and hasn't wavered at all. It will be one of those variables when it comes time to choose where to go.
  • KatMTKatMT Posts: 3,422College Rep Senior Member
    Where I teach there are opportunities for students with strong skills to be hired to work in the scene, electrics, or costume shops.... sometimes shop assistants are non-majors.... and there are others who volunteer their time in the shop or on run crew. At many schools your son may also be able to declare a theatre minor and take some course that is relevant.
  • TheRealKEVPTheRealKEVP Posts: 986- Member
    NJTheatreMom:

    Where I was an undergrad, Columbia College Chicago, there were so MANY student directed productions each semester that there was always a shortage of people in ALL jobs. I often ended up being the costume designer and set designer for my own shows, in addition to being the director. Stage Managers were the real issue, because realistically a director couldn't also be a Stage Manager. I would have loved someone to show up and say "Hey, I would like to be a Lighting Designer (or Costume Designer, Set Designer, Stage Manager . . .) for a show. Could I volunteer to do that for you?"

    But I do realize that every school is different.

    KEVP
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