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Feeling trapped?

cbass94cbass94 Posts: 2Registered User New Member
edited September 2013 in Transfer Students
I'm a first semester Freshman at a small liberal arts college in the city, and to put it lightly, I'm very unhappy here. This school doesn't feel like the right "fit" for me, I don't feel like I belong here, and I don't like that it's a Catholic school (something I thought I wanted out of a college, but realized that I don't).

My parents have forced me to go see a counselor once a week because of my unhappiness, but it doesn't seem to be helping? All they tell me is to stick it out because eventually I'll love it here and I'll "never want to go home." Problem is, I didn't want to go here in the first place, but my parents insisted I stay at least a semester. The school also advised my parents not to let me come home, because it will make the transition to college harder on me.

The school has basically shoved down my throat no matter who I talk to that I will "love it here before I know it" and I feel trapped and extremely unhappy in this city because my parents won't bring me home, and I have no where else to go.

I've made plans to transfer out, because I don't see myself liking it any more than I do now in two months.

I'm just wondering if anyone has any actual tips on how to make it through the semester?
Post edited by cbass94 on

Replies to: Feeling trapped?

  • entomomentomom Posts: 23,644Registered User Senior Member
    It would help if you elaborated on why you're unhappy. Why is the fit not right?

    Too conservative? Too Greek? Commuter school? What?
  • JuvenisJuvenis Posts: 785Registered User Member
    I can sympathize with you, OP, since I'm planning on transferring out after a year.

    What helps me get through is keeping my eyes on the prize: making sure I do well in all my classes and getting the highest GPA possible in preparation for the admissions process.

    Getting involved in a few clubs and sports have also helped me ease through, even if they are potentially temporary. They keep me busy and my mind off school.

    This was purely luck, but I found a small group of friends whom I'm very close to and who just so happen to be living right across my hallway -- or actually THEY found ME. What's even luckier is that a couple of my friends would also like to transfer out after a year, so they understand my aspirations and are great outlets for talking about transferring. Nevertheless, I can't stress how important it is to point out that this could be an exceptional case since I did get lucky.

    If you really want to transfer, though, your parents NEED to approve first. It will be an absolute STRUGGLE to try to convince parents (btdt), and judging how you described your parents, yours might end up being a rough conversation, but you don't want to spend time and energy trying to transfer only to find out that your parents will put their foot down right before everything is due.
  • cbass94cbass94 Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    @Entomom

    The school feels stifling. The campus is incredibly small (I feel almost like I'm running a hamster wheel), and the school has a reputation for being more on the strict and conservative side in regards to rules and policies.

    The main reason I applied here was because of its reputation for its science programs. But I recently figured out that sciences are not my calling. At all. So my main reason for attending this school doesn't even apply any more.

    @Juvenis

    That's lucky that you have found a group of people who also want to transfer! Unluckily, everyone I met here absolutely loves the school, so I've been alone on that front.

    I'll try joining more clubs and activities to keep me busy and keep my mind off things. That's a good idea.
  • entomomentomom Posts: 23,644Registered User Senior Member
    You're lucky that you're in a city and not in a rural or suburban area. Get off campus, learn how to use the local mass transit system. Go to museums, parks, whatever appeals to you. And look for volunteer opportunities in the community as well.
  • UCorBust1UCorBust1 Posts: 38Registered User Junior Member
    Definitely join clubs and organizations. It makes a world of a difference when you develop strong relationships with other students. Then you don't feel like you're going through it all alone.
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