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Transferring from a Canadian university to an ivy league?

Sean1218Sean1218 Posts: 148Registered User Junior Member
edited May 2011 in Transfer Students
I don't see myself getting into an ivy league from high school because of how much I slacked off the first two and a half years of school (I'm in grade 11). My marks were decent, 84-86 average, but I also had/have no extra curriculars (except for self-taught guitar since I was 11, I play a lot).

However, I'm putting more effort now, and will finish this year with a 90%+ average (been getting 97-100 on everything since new year). I also plan to volunteer at a hospital over the summer, I'll join a couple clubs in grade 12, and should finish grade 12 with a 95%+ average without much trouble.

Still, I understand I won't get into an ivy league out of high school, but what about after 2nd year university? I was thinking of continuing to put the effort in and get amazing marks at either University of Toronto or McGill University, along with a lot of extra-curricular stuff. If after a year or two of this, would it be possible for me to transfer to an ivy league in the US? Columbia, Brown or other?

If that's not possible, what about after earning my bachelors (either engineering, physics, or pre-med), would I have a chance of getting into a good ivy league graduate school?

Thanks for any responses!
Post edited by Sean1218 on

Replies to: Transferring from a Canadian university to an ivy league?

  • tomofbostontomofboston Posts: 2,115Registered User Senior Member
    Ivy league schools accept very few transfers, and they cost a fortune as you are no doubt aware. There is little if any merit award money for transfers too. Most Ivy's award no merit money period.

    You would be better off graduating from McGill or U of T with a very high GPA and doing graduate work at an Ivy. If money is not an issue for your family, they could save the money for you to use in your graduate education.
  • Sean1218Sean1218 Posts: 148Registered User Junior Member
    What are graduate schools looking for then (same as undergraduate ivy leagues?)? They wouldn't look at high school still would they?
  • tomofbostontomofboston Posts: 2,115Registered User Senior Member
    Grad schools, whether Ivy league or not, could care less about your high school record. It is ancient history to them. Grad schools will look at your GPA, GRE/GMAT/LSAT/MCAT test scores and recommendations from university profs, interviews etc. If you come out of McGill, U of T, Queen's etc. with an outstanding record, you will be evaluated on an equal basis with grads of top US schools.

    Spend the rest of your high school time working as hard as you can to get into a top Canadian university and save the money fror grad school. Go to McGill or U of T, avoid Concordia or Ryerson, for example.

    FYI: The current president of Princeton University is a Queen's alum, the previous president was a McGill alum.
  • BasementCatBasementCat Posts: 145Registered User Junior Member
    The "cost a fortune" part would depend on how much money the OP's family has. The Ivies (and other top universities in the U.S.) tend to hand out mountains of financial aid for those with significant financial need.

    And for grad schools, the standard advice is that you need to get involved in research and find a researcher whose interests and areas of research match yours. That, apparently, is more important than GPA and test scores as long as your grades and scores are adequate. Check the graduate forums--those guys know a bit more about this kind of thing.
  • Sean1218Sean1218 Posts: 148Registered User Junior Member
    Quote (tomofboston): "Spend the rest of your high school time working as hard as you can to get into a top Canadian university and save the money fror grad school. Go to McGill or U of T, avoid Concordia or Ryerson, for example."

    What would I need to achieve in order to attend a top law school in the US after graduating from U of T or McGill? Apart from 170+ LSAT, and a near 4.0 GPA, what else can I do to increase my chances?

    edit: looking to go to Stanford, Yale, or Harvard law, however I'd be just as ecstatic with Columbia or NYU
  • JoshByronJoshByron Posts: 651Registered User Member
    Umm...how would you get into McGill or University of Toronto with grades like that anyways? They are both pretty competitive schools with low acceptance rates...
  • nodirdnodird Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    It depends on the program and faculty that is in your aim. If you visit their admissions standards for previous years in Ontario or even elsewhere (Admissions standards for previous years is the link) you will notice that there are some programs that have a 75% average cut-off. Although, this should be taken with a grain of salt since it is border line and most people even in these programs with lower cut-offs enter with much higher grades.
  • JMSB2MCGILL2LSEJMSB2MCGILL2LSE Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    I can tell you now, with a 95% average in high school, both UofT and McGill will accept you. On average students with 84% and up get into McGill and UofT. I want to go to an Ivy for graduate school as well. I plan to finish either McGill Desautels or Richard Ivey with a near 4.0 GPA. I am still worried about getting into one of those top schools for graduate studies.
  • caligulashorsecaligulashorse Posts: 311Registered User Member
    You say you're interested in NYU? Is that for undergrad or graduate? The Ivy Leagues are near impossible to get into as an undergrad transfer, but NYU's more than doable. I'd give it a shot.
  • tomofbostontomofboston Posts: 2,115Registered User Senior Member
    On average students with 84% and up get into McGill and UofT.
    The minimum for admission to McGill Management and Science is a 91.5%. Other faculties are lower.
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