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Potentially useful table of transfer admit GPAs and rates by major and campus

ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 61,597 Senior Member
edited May 2016 in UC Transfers
http://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/infocenter/transfers-major

It may help future transfer students aiming for UCs to estimate realistic expectations of admission results.
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Replies to: Potentially useful table of transfer admit GPAs and rates by major and campus

  • uctransfer16uctransfer16 Registered User Posts: 123 Junior Member
    This is great, thanks!
  • yakattakyakattak Registered User Posts: 79 Junior Member
    Good stuff. I wonder why the enroll GPA range typically starts lower than the admit GPA range. Could it be that some low GPA students enroll from the waitlist and are not considered admits?
  • mikemacmikemac Registered User Posts: 9,488 Senior Member
    I wonder why the enroll GPA range typically starts lower than the admit GPA range
    My thought is this reflects student choice. Students typically apply to many UCs. The ranges shown are the 25th-75th percentile. Those in the higher end at less selective UCs are more likely to get accepted at and enroll at more selective UCs, this isn't true for those in the bottom end of the spectrum. So lop off some higher-GPA students and the average falls. At Cal and UCLA the dropoff in GPA looks small for most majors.
  • yakattakyakattak Registered User Posts: 79 Junior Member
    Oh yeah, I didn't notice that it was the 25th to 75th percentile range. Makes perfect sense now.
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 61,597 Senior Member
    edited May 2016
    The enrolled range of GPA is commonly lower than the admitted range of GPA because the admits at the higher end of the range are more likely to have other admission offers from comparably or more selective schools, so their yield tends to be lower (students are more likely to pick one of the more selective schools that admitted them).
  • Raftar94Raftar94 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    edited May 2016
    Though I believe this info to be very useful, I just want to point out that there are always exceptions.

    If you're a student and feel discouraged, I highly recommend you still apply to schools well outside your GPA range.

    As anecdotal evidence, this year I got into Berkeley for EECS. It has a 3.88-4.0 GPA range. I have a 3.67. When applying I had initially not included Cal, until my mom forced me to apply to it. I know the fee is $75 but it's well worth the shot.

    Don't rely or expect to get in, but certainly don't exclude yourself.


    Edit: great find @ucbalumnus
  • laccstudentlaccstudent Registered User Posts: 197 Junior Member
    @Rftar94 if you don't mind me asking, what was your Major GPA?
  • Raftar94Raftar94 Registered User Posts: 7 New Member
    edited May 2016
    @laccstudent 4.0

    My overall was pulled down from classes unrelated to my major that were still uc transferable.
  • laccstudentlaccstudent Registered User Posts: 197 Junior Member
    @raftar94 ah, that's why. I think EECS weighs more on your Major GPA than overall. Getting all A's in those major requirements is impressive :)
  • ucbalumnusucbalumnus Registered User Posts: 61,597 Senior Member
    edited May 2016
    Having a GPA below the lower end of the 25th-75th percentile range just means that you should consider that campus and major to be a reach. After all, 25% of admits had GPA below the 25th percentile, so there is a chance, but not as good a chance compared to having a higher GPA relative to the 25th-75th percentile range. Of course, things like grades in major prerequisites and essays count as well.
  • ergergeigrgergergeigrg Registered User Posts: 6 New Member
    what happens if you go over 90 units? can you still transfer?
  • Orangered123Orangered123 Registered User Posts: 525 Member
    If they've all been taken at a California community college, than yes. If even part of the units have been taken elsewhere things are a bit complicated.
  • otoribashiotoribashi Registered User Posts: 505 Member
    To answer someone's question about enroll GPAs being lower than admit GPAs

    I think those with high admit GPAs probably got accepted to better schools and went elsewhere, while a UC was a good enough goal for the ones with relatively lower admit GPAs

    3.9 gpa gets accepted to UCB, UCLA, Cornell, some other Ivys, ect. Well of course they will probably go to the better school. That and they may receive more aid at other schools, especially privates.

    while UCLA/Cal were probably only the highest schools a 3.6 or 3.7 could get into and of course they would attend there if that's their best option.

    Those with higher GPAs have better options elsewhere, I'd imagine. Plus they might get some merit scholarships or something at a private.
  • doihaveashot2016doihaveashot2016 Registered User Posts: 252 Junior Member
    This is super helpful, thank you!!
  • GiantflossGiantfloss Registered User Posts: 11 New Member
    when will the 2016 year be included? and what does yield rate mean?
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