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Cal Admission rate for international applicants much lower than UCLA

ArchAngel0ArchAngel0 Posts: 58Registered User Junior Member
According to the UC Admissions Office stats, last year UCLA admitted 32% of international applicants whereas Cal admitted 12% even though the overall admission rate and number of international applicants were almost identical. In fact over the three years of 10, 11 and 12 UCLA was always in the 30s while Cal was in the 20s then suddenly cut to 12% last year.

Does this show that UCLA is less selective towards international applicants than Cal, that I as an international applicant will have a higher chance of being accepted to UCLA than Cal when applying to both? Seems like a pretty interesting contrast between the policies of the two campuses.

Source:
http://www.ucop.edu/news/factsheets/...ons_table2.pdf
Post edited by ArchAngel0 on
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Replies to: Cal Admission rate for international applicants much lower than UCLA

  • ArchAngel0ArchAngel0 Posts: 58Registered User Junior Member
    Does Cal get more funding or something like that?
  • beyphybeyphy Posts: 2,157Registered User Senior Member
    I think when the first wave of budget cuts happened it was like 500m. between 90-100m (20%) of that funding directly went to UCLA. While Cal isn't in an amazing position right now either, I think the budget cuts hurt UCLA significantly more. So that might explain it.

    UCLA is also the most competitive UC campus for Calfiornia students (admitting less than 18%) and will probably be the first campus this year in the United States to break 100,000 applicants.
  • ArchAngel0ArchAngel0 Posts: 58Registered User Junior Member
    Wow some crazy numbers there.
  • RMLRML Posts: 5,823Registered User Senior Member
    During my time (1999-2000), the admit rate was something like 6% for international students. There were years when Berkeley's admit rate for international students was 4.7% only. I was admitted at 4 Ivies (including Columbia) and Cambridge in the UK, but wasn't even a wait-list at Berkeley. (Back then, Berkeley didn't have a wait-list.)

    Berkeley admits less than UCLA does because Berkeley's yield rate (for international students) has always been higher too. I think that's the reason why.
  • beyphybeyphy Posts: 2,157Registered User Senior Member
    Are there any good sources for cross admit enrollment between UCLA and Berkeley? The only one i know of is Parchmount, which i'm skeptical of.

    Last year, UCLA was overenrolled because its yield was higher than it had traditionally been, resulting in it getting a wait-list for the first time in its history.

    But that yield being higher was because Berkeley admitted less students. As a result, instead of deciding whether to matriculate to UCLA and Berkeley, many were just admitted to UCLA, and decided to matriculate there.
    Cox also pointed to the fact that many students choose between UCLA and UC Berkeley when making their college decision. While overlap between the two schools has been fairly stable over the years, it was lower last year, Cox said.

    Because they did not have to choose between the two schools, a higher number of students chose to come to UCLA in comparison to previous years, Cox said.

    The Daily Bruin :: UCLA wait-lists 2,900 for first time in school?s history

    This, as a result, affected UCLA's admission decisions for fall 2012.
    Facing over-enrollment from last year, when 440 more freshmen than expected enrolled at UCLA, the campus was forced to reduce its admission of California residents for fall 2012 by nearly 1,800 students to reach its enrollment target of approximately 4,000 California resident freshmen.

    UCLA admits more than 15,000 students for fall 2012 freshman class / UCLA Newsroom
  • d313711d313711 Posts: 41Registered User Junior Member
    RML. That's interesting to know. My daughter was also admitted to Cambridge and Berkeley. May I ask what was your subject study when you applied to Cambridge and Berkeley?
  • RMLRML Posts: 5,823Registered User Senior Member
    ^ Computer Science, that's for almost all the schools where I applied to.
  • meakamemeakame Posts: 639Registered User Member
    I want to make a note regarding admission to Cambridge vs Berkeley:
    Cambridge always has a higher admission rate, making it look like it's less selective. It's true; they do take in a higher percentage of applicants. But this is solely because you are restricted to applying to five programs of study in the UK. (Not even five schools; five programs), unlike here, where, if you have the money, you can apply to as many schools as you want.

    I have also heard that Berkeley rejects students that are "too good" for it, because they want to increase their yield rate – that might be another reason.
  • terencterenc Posts: 1,127Registered User Senior Member
    ^Berkeley rejecting students because they are too good for it is simply not true. Firstly because it's not very likely this happens at any school in general, and secondly because it is even less likely to happen at a top school. I think this is an urban myth that is repeated over and over again.
  • d313711d313711 Posts: 41Registered User Junior Member
    To my knowledge, applications to Cambridge have to be supported by the teachers or the counselors of the high school that one is attending. I don't think the admission rate is good indicator for selectivity between Cambridge and other top U.S. universities .

    Sent from my GT-I9300 using CC
  • RMLRML Posts: 5,823Registered User Senior Member
    meakame: Cambridge's admit rate for international applicants has always been around 10%. In some years, it's lower than 10%. The 15%-17% admit rate for Cambridge includes local applicants. But, by and large, both Oxford and Cambridge are quite selective for international students. And, I wasn't implying that Cambridge is easier to get into than Berkeley. I was trying to say that Berkeley isn't as easy to get into as what some (arrogant) students are trying to say. Berkeley's admissions are very unpredictable. Hundreds of students with superb stats (perfect SAT score, etc.) were being rejected every year. Last years' stats alone would tell you that Berkeley rejected thousands of students with SATs ranging from 2300 to 2400. That should tell you something. And, I bet that some of those students are now at the Ivies, Stanford, MIT or Caltech.
  • RMLRML Posts: 5,823Registered User Senior Member
    To my knowledge, applications to Cambridge have to be supported by the teachers or the counselors of the high school that one is attending. I don't think the admission rate is good indicator for selectivity between Cambridge and other top U.S. universities.

    That is true. Because in the UK, you cannot apply to more than 5 universities. You also CANNOT apply to Cambridge and Oxford at the same time. I could imagine the admit rate would drop significantly when the students can apply to both unis simultaneously. One of the advantages of limiting the number of unis that a student can apply to is that the enrollment yield rate of the unis would tend to be higher. At Harvard, the enrollment yield rate is something like 79%, and amongst the top schools, it's one of the highest in the whole US. Cambridge's yield rate has always been around 95%. Very few students turn down Cambridge's offer.
  • d313711d313711 Posts: 41Registered User Junior Member
    Sometimes, Cambridge offer was turned down because of subject studied. If one is unsure of spending 3 years to study one subject that may not have promising career prospect, one may turn down Cambridge.
  • beyphybeyphy Posts: 2,157Registered User Senior Member
    Last years' stats alone would tell you that Berkeley rejected thousands of students with SATs ranging from 2300 to 2400. That should tell you something. And, I bet that some of those students are now at the Ivies, Stanford, MIT or Caltech.

    It probably tells you that Berkeley rejects applicants it knows will matriculate to the better universities they'll get admitted to. Even against Stanford, Berkeley only has a 2% enrollment against students accepted there. If you'll be accepted into HYPSM, there's no point in Berkeley accepting you. It's a wasted admit.
  • RMLRML Posts: 5,823Registered User Senior Member
    ^ I don't see it that way. I think that's NOT how the adcom guys think. That's not how the Berkeley admissions work, in general.

    There's a lot of reasons why Berkeley couldn't compete with Stanford -- same geographic location (Bay Area), climate, slightly better reputation, better hand-holding system, etc.. But Berkeley can provide some good reasons to turn down Yale, for instance. For example, a guy like me would be more attracted to Berkeley than Yale because Berkeley has a top 3 computer science program, not only in America, but in the entire world. If I would have to position myself better in the IT world, Berkeley would provide me that better than Yale would, I believe, because Berkeley alumni are some of the major proponents of the largest and most successful SV companies. And, from where I come from (Europe), Berkeley is seen as prestigious as Yale. And, for some circles, viewed superior to Yale.

    Berkeley's enrollment yield rate for International Students has always been very high -- always above 50%. Almost all of them have also been admitted to a number of top private schools. Just last year alone, 2 guys from the Philippines matriculated at Berkeley. The first guy was also admitted at Caltech, Brown and Cornell. The second guy, was also admitted at Penn, Duke, Michigan, Georgetown and Rice.
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