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sitting in classes you're not enrolled in

hallo88hallo88 Posts: 80Registered User Junior Member
I was wondering if professors are willing to let students do this, who aren't their own, but are interested in a subject. I realize that one doesn't get the full benefit of taking a course and doing all the work, but often one may be interested in something and doesn't have the time or motivation to do the work.

soo...how are those opportunities? Do you find them beneficial/enlightening/fun? Is there motivation to even go to random classes for a whole semester or just a few times..after having fallen into the rut of things? Examples of courses you particularly liked?

Just am curious :) thank you
Post edited by hallo88 on

Replies to: sitting in classes you're not enrolled in

  • unlimitedxunlimitedx Posts: 3,007Registered User Senior Member
    It's all up to you. Generally the professor will have no idea you are even in the class for the large lectures. In fact, he won't even know most students' names...

    Now for the smaller classes you should just speak to the professor for permission as etiquette or else you will make him wonder why you are there.
  • BeConfidentBeConfident Posts: 291Registered User Junior Member
    For the lectures you can probably do it, and people won't notice. I think it might be kinda fun for the first time, but I wouldn't waste the time to check other classes.
  • BlueElmoBlueElmo Posts: 1,131Registered User Senior Member
    do professors stay after to talk to sutdents? For large lecture classes?
  • op_cityop_city Posts: 70Registered User Junior Member
    You can sit in whenever you want because classes are usually too big for the teachers to notice.
  • DRabDRab Posts: 6,107Registered User Senior Member
    Many of the introductory classes are too big for the people to notice. It really depends and is on a class specific basis, but it's true, many will be large enough for profs to not notice, especially the lectures in the lower division. Some profs do stay after to talk to students. Some come early to do that.

    Many people sit in classes they aren't enrolled in to "shop" them, and some just to learn about the subject.
  • DarkPyr0DarkPyr0 Posts: 332Registered User Member
    I got my friend to sit-in on my EE20 final and actually take it, though she didn't turn it in. :)

    Only the people around us noticed because we were laughing like idiots in the beginning.

    Besides if you sit in on a class and like it, you can enroll in it.

    It's just like people on the waitlist going to class even though they aren't officially in it yet.
  • khankhan Posts: 216Registered User Junior Member
    This is a commonly known practice such that there's a term for it: auditing.

    When you're auditing a class, you're basically attending without getting credit for it. You're there just to learn or get a feel for a certain class/topic. You can easily audit the larger classes without being noticed... and I would say even many of the smaller classes. You may want to give the professor a heads up for the smaller classes though - most won't have any problems with this.
  • DRabDRab Posts: 6,107Registered User Senior Member
    Isnt' "crashing" a more common word?
  • undecidedundecided Posts: 2,029Registered User Senior Member
    Crashing is sitting in at the beginning of the term in the hopes that some of the members of the full class will drop out and you, because you have been attending, will get their spot.

    Auditing is exactly at khan described it, though it's important to note that you often still have to pay for the units you aren't earning... for some reason. Not sure how that works at Berkeley.
  • DRabDRab Posts: 6,107Registered User Senior Member
    Hmm . . . I've never head that definition. Perhaps you're correct.
  • ttgiang15ttgiang15 Posts: 743Registered User Member
    I don't think the OP is referring to "auditing." It appears as though auditing refers to one who formally signs up for a class but decides to not take the course for a grade or units. If one were to do this, he or she would have to pay for the units in the course (especially at a community college. tuition is same for everyone at Berkeley in terms of number of units taken, right?). I believe the OP is merely interested in sitting in on some quality lectures by some of the best professors in the world. No problem with that. It's a grand idea, though I don't think your enthusiasm will last past several weeks. Prove me wrong, kid, prove me wrong!

    Best of luck,
    TTG
  • hallo88hallo88 Posts: 80Registered User Junior Member
    ahaha thanks, i'm afraid of that too, that all this motivation/curiosity/interest will soon be sapped away..i'd love to prove you wrong though ! hahh
  • vicissitudesvicissitudes Posts: 3,498Registered User Senior Member
    I believe the OP is merely interested in sitting in on some quality lectures by some of the best professors in the world. No problem with that. It's a grand idea, though I don't think your enthusiasm will last past several weeks.

    That's why we should only audit classes. :)

    Though ttgiang15 made a good point...tuition at Berkeley is the same no matter how many units we take, right? As a Chinese I should really try taking 30 units per semester to get my money's worth.
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