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Is the Penn Visit worth to attend?

13

Replies to: Is the Penn Visit worth to attend?

  • rebeccarrebeccar Registered User Posts: 1,993 Senior Member
    Can anyone comment on whether the info session is worthwhile? I was already admitted (for grad school) but have never visited the school and am attending the undergraduate tour. I don't know if I should bother with the info session, though. I don't know much about the school.
  • MamalumperMamalumper Registered User Posts: 457 Member
    The info session is definitely geared for undergraduates. I would just do the tour, your guide will be able to answer all questions you have about the university as a whole.
  • rebeccarrebeccar Registered User Posts: 1,993 Senior Member
    Great, thanks. I'm 99.99% positive I'm attending, it'd just be more to familiarize myself with the school. I think the tour should suffice.
  • go2momgo2mom Registered User Posts: 405 Member
    As a westcoaster, I had never visited the Ivies. What my D and I found interesting is that there is a signifcant cultural and academic difference that you can only find by visiting the campuses and doing an information session. Penn really stresses an interdisciplinary focus while Princeton talks more about the power of independent research (financialy supported by the school). Brown was definitely "looser" and Yale students seemd the happiest. So, knowing that it's a crap shoot getting into any of them, it is "educational" to figure out which one is the best fit for YOU.
  • PoemePoeme Registered User Posts: 1,329 Senior Member
    @rebeccar, aren't there visiting days for the graduate program you were admitted to? I think going during those days would be much more useful. If you are talking about a PhD program they will pay for it and reimburse you for your travels.
    I am friends with a lot of grad students in my department and it is very easy to tell that life as a grad student is way different from that of an undergrad at Penn. They are all very happy though, perhaps more so than the average undergrad.
  • rebeccarrebeccar Registered User Posts: 1,993 Senior Member
    @Poeme yes there were, but during the schoolyear while I'm still at college and I couldn't make it. You're totally right that it would have been more useful. The undergrad admissions was a huuuuuge waste of time-- not Penn's fault at all, it would have been great if I was an incoming freshman, but I don't know what I was even thinking by sitting through it.
  • PoemePoeme Registered User Posts: 1,329 Senior Member
    Everyone will miss class for grad school visits, professors know that and are totally okay with it usually. I will be visiting 5 schools and will miss class for three of them. My professors in my major are all thrilled I am going and the ones outside are being accommodating as well. It is also better financially since travel is reimbursed and everything else is free.
  • rebeccarrebeccar Registered User Posts: 1,993 Senior Member
    Is it honestly that popular to attend? I'm genuinely asking because now I'm kind of nervous that I'm not. I saw the email and didn't really think much of it, figuring I'd get all the information I needed at orientation. Surely people from all over the country won't be coming for a day.
  • PoemePoeme Registered User Posts: 1,329 Senior Member
    Well it is always good to go, but especially if you are in a Phd program since you will be working with a specific advisor and will be staying for five years. I'm sure it is also important for med school and law school as well, maybe not as much for a masters.
  • Saona63Saona63 Registered User Posts: 392 Member
    My S was invited all expenses paid:)) I guess he will be visiting
  • rebeccarrebeccar Registered User Posts: 1,993 Senior Member
    I'll just be in a master's 10-month program. Looked it up and apparently last year approx. 70 out of 460 people went. I feel much better now, haha thank you.

    Congrats on the paid visit ^
  • WhartonnotHYPSWhartonnotHYPS Registered User Posts: 167 Junior Member
    I believe its a function of what you do at Penn
  • ivyleaguefanivyleaguefan Registered User Posts: 236 Junior Member
    It was too good that it caught my dad obsessed with it, and made him verbally battling with me for months since I received my rejection from Penn. :(
  • ilovethecityilovethecity Registered User Posts: 436 Member
    edited January 2015
    I visited Penn in August 2014. The info session was really general, and didn't really offer any new insights. Sometimes, the adcom said, "I think it's better if your tour guide answered that question."

    However, I enjoyed my tour and getting to hear from a current Penn student. Walking around the campus was worth it.
    And also, Penn has this place called the Kelly Writers House where you can collect publications written by current students. I thought that was a memorable part of my tour.

    In the end, it's definitely worth it to visit. You get a feel for the campus + student body.
  • perseverance1perseverance1 Registered User Posts: 27 New Member
    For others wondering if demonstrated interest matters at this school (it doesn't matter at all schools), according to the Common Data Set, UPenn does consider a student's interest.
This discussion has been closed.