Welcome to College Confidential!

The leading college-bound community on the web

Sign Up For Free

Join for FREE, and start talking with other members, weighing in on community polls, and more.

Also, by registering and logging in you'll see fewer ads and pesky welcome messages (like this one!)

As a CC member, you can:

Interview Thank you letter

nivek114nivek114 Posts: 12Registered User New Member
How should I write a thank you letter to my interviewer and what should I include?
Post edited by nivek114 on

Replies to: Interview Thank you letter

  • dontstopbelievindontstopbelievin Posts: 675Registered User Member
    are you guys all writing thank you letters?
  • PABankPABank Posts: 317Registered User Junior Member
    i didnt...
  • wg90210wg90210 Posts: 851Registered User Member
    i do to all of my interviews.
    i feel kind of weird just leaving it hanging, but that's just me!
  • yodastreetyodastreet Posts: 428Registered User Member
    I just make mine all short little thank-you notes. Two or three lines at most.
  • necrophiliacnecrophiliac Posts: 1,061Registered User Senior Member
    it's protocol to write a thank you letter.

    Dear Mr/Ms/Dr. _________,

    Thank you for meeting with me today. I really enjoyed hearing about _________ and was rather impressed with ________. I hope you enjoyed my company as much as I enjoyed yours.

    Sincerely,

    ______________


    how hard can it be?
  • CuteAccountantCuteAccountant Posts: 123Registered User Junior Member
    I just sent an email expressing my thanks for his time and for providing useful advice/experiences. It was a just a paragraph.

    Basically just thank the interviewer for his time and mention a few brief points that stood out to you or was eye-opening during the interview. So it's not just a "Hi, thanks for the interview, bye," type of letter.
  • mrngoricketsmrngorickets Posts: 2Registered User New Member
    Hi,

    Thanks very much for this comment. It help me to think about my ideals.

    Tks again and pls keep posting.
  • murtaza101murtaza101 Posts: 400Registered User Member
    It's a thank-you letter, not a marriage proposal, just write that you're thankful as the interviewer took time to interview you and give you an opportunity to tell more about yourself, and telling useful advice/experiences, just wht CuteAccountant said above.
  • UVAorBustUVAorBust Posts: 2,504Registered User Senior Member
    Always, always write a thank you letter. I really think it shows you care about the school. In all of mine I wrote about specifics the interviewer hit. If we had something in common I mentioned it. For one of my interview thank you notes, I even included a link to my favorite restaurant, as we talked about food for a while :D
  • murtaza101murtaza101 Posts: 400Registered User Member
    Also, its always great to write thank-you letters/notes for all of your interviews. It shows that it's not just out of courtesy, but that you have a humble personality, anyone will be happy to see that the interviews they conduct are appreciated by someone. :)
  • chelsearoxchelsearox Posts: 471Registered User Member
    I wrote one. I don't see any harm in NOT writing one.
  • pkm2232pkm2232 Posts: 340Registered User Member
    I only did for one. For all the others, I had thanked them at the end of the interview and the way we left it made me feel a thank you letter would be gratuitous.
  • CollegeGuruCollegeGuru Posts: 186Registered User Junior Member
    ^I didn't write one because for me it seemed superfluous. I said thank-you in person.
  • HastyCentaurHastyCentaur Posts: 73Registered User Junior Member
    I completely agree with UVAorBust. I think a thank you note (especially a handwritten one) can go a long way. When I went to a UChicago admitted student reception, I met my interviewer and the first thing he did was thank me for the thank you letter I mailed to his office. His wife later told my parents that I was the only applicant from the EA pool that sent a handwritten thank you note. With college decisions being so random these days, the little things do matter.
Sign In or Register to comment.